Readers Respond

November 17, 2009

Church doesn't ostracize gays

The editorial on Sunday referred to the Catholic Church's "misguided effort to ostracize gays" ("D.C. archdiocese oversteps its bounds," Nov. 15). Regardless of whether the Archdiocese of Washington is justified in its actions, the editors demonstrate their lack of understanding of the church's position on homosexuality. That position is not about ostracizing anyone and has its basis in the biology of male and female bodies. That biology is the same whether one believes we were created by God or were an accident of the universe.

Rick Williams, Ellicott City

How can a gay couple go forth and multiply?

I don't understand, why everyone has trouble understanding the Catholic Church's position on gay marriage ("D.C. archdiocese oversteps its bounds," Nov. 15). The Church's position was given by God, not by the members of the Church. In the Bible, Jesus didn't deviate from the 10 Commandments. So how can a Church, established by Jesus, deviate from the same commandments?

We are taught, God loves the sinner, not the sin. Giving any kind of support that encourages gay marriage would go against God's commandments, no matter whose money is involved. In Genesis, God told Adam and Eve to increase and multiply and fill the earth. God didn't command Adam and Eve to use each other for self fulfillment. That being said, how can a gay couple go forth and multiply?

Tim Weber, Baltimore

Catholic church blackmails D.C.

I would like to suggest that the Catholic Church has not issued an ultimatum ("D.C. same-sex provision leads to Catholic Church ultimatum," Nov. 16). They are using blackmail as a means of forcing the D.C. City Council to bend to the will of the church. If the council bends to this type of threat, they will be opening up a door for all levels of government in the United States to be subjected to political tactics that are not a part of our democratic heritage.

I would suggest the Catholic Church use more traditional methods to influence the political process. Our political culture accepts paid advertising, contacting counsilmen via phone or letter campaigns, staging political rallies, etc. I hope our nation is not willing to accept blackmail as an approved method of gaining political support for the position of any group, religious or secular.

Gary Vosburg, Catonsville

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