Jewish School To Move To Owings Mills

November 12, 2009|By Mary Gail Hare | Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com

An independent Jewish high school in Baltimore has announced plans to relocate its campus to the grounds of the former Rosewood Center in Owings Mills.

The Shoshana S. Cardin School for students in grades nine through 12 will purchase 55 acres of the property in Owings Mills from The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore, which had abandoned its development concept for the site. School officials declined to make public the purchase price until the sale is settled.

The school parcel is part of the 300-acre state-run institution for the developmentally disabled that closed in June after its remaining patients were relocated to community settings. Rosewood, which opened in the late 19th century, once housed as many as 3,000 patients, many of whom lived their entire lives within its walls.

The Cardin School expects to adapt for its use the Kanner Building, built in 1972 and one of the newest facilities on the campus.

Cardin administrators will conduct a study to determine Kanner's suitability for academic purposes. If the study finds conditions are favorable, renovation of the one-story brick building, which once housed offices and services for hearing-impaired patients, would begin in midwinter.

The 8,000-square-foot building at Rosewood Lane and Garrison Forest Road would likely be ready for the new school year in September.

"We know this building is usable, solid and free of asbestos," said Barbie Prince, head of the Cardin School.

About 60 students are enrolled at the school, which opened in 2002 in space it rents from Oheb Shalom on Park Heights Avenue in Northwest Baltimore.

"From the beginning, our goal was to own our own school," Prince said. "The Owings Mills location is ideal as the Jewish population has moved northwest from the city."

With 55 acres, the school will eventually add other facilities, including a gym and athletic fields, she said. The school's nearest neighbor could well be Stevenson University, which is pursuing its interest in acquiring the remaining Rosewood property.

"It would be phenomenal to have a university as our neighbor," Prince said.

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