Bad Habits In Midlife Raise Dementia Risk

August 31, 2009|By U.S. News & World Report

People who smoke, have high blood pressure, or have diabetes in their 40s and 50s increase their chances of developing dementia, BBC News reports. U.S. researchers, who studied more than 11,000 people between the ages of 46 and 70, found that people who smoked were 70 percent more likely than nonsmokers to develop dementia over the next 12 to 14 years.

People with hypertension, meantime, were 60 percent more likely to develop dementia than those with normal blood pressure. The study, published in the journal Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, also showed that people with diabetes doubled their chance of developing dementia. Research published in March linked obesity, diabetes, and heart disease to dementia.

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