Jesse N. Mcdade-bey, Taught Philosophy

August 10, 2009|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

Jesse N. McDade-Bey, who taught philosophy at Morgan State University for nearly 30 years and had been a frequent guest on WJZ-TV's "Square Off" talk show, died of vascular dementia July 27 at the Joseph Richey House hospice. He was 72 and had lived in Hamilton.

Dr. McDade-Bey, the son of a Methodist minister and a homemaker, was born and raised in Knoxville, Tenn.

After graduating from Austin High School in 1956, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1960 from Clark University in Worcester, Mass. He earned master's and doctorate degrees in philosophy from Boston University.

He taught at Brown University in Providence, R.I., from 1969 to 1972, when he joined the faculty of the University of California, Riverside.

Dr. McDade-Bey taught at Clark University from 1973 to 1974, then moved to Baltimore and joined the faculty at Morgan.

He took a sabbatical and taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1981 to 1982, then returned to Morgan. He retired in 1999.

Dr. McDade-Bey also taught part time at Sojourner-Douglass College of Baltimore and at the University of the District of Columbia.

He participated in the Lorton Prison graduate program with the University of the District of Columbia-based Pan African Student Union Association.

In addition to his appearances on "Square Off," Dr. McDade-Bey had hosted two radio talk shows, "The Drum" on WEAA and "The Spear" on WPFW.

"He was an unapologetic defender of the human community in general and of the equal rights within that community of black people in particular," said a son, Jesse "Jay" McDade of Baltimore.

He was an avid boxing fan and enjoyed listening to music and boating.

Services were held Aug. 3 in the chapel at Morgan.

Also surviving are two other sons, Malik McDade and Jamari McDade, both of Baltimore; five daughters, Terrye McDade, Jere McDade and Nataka McDade, all of Baltimore, Mika McDade of Randallstown and Jessie McDade of Brooklyn, N.Y.; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. His two marriages ended in divorce.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.