Bromwell Records Kept Sealed

July 18, 2009|By Tricia Bishop | Tricia Bishop,tricia.bishop@baltsun.com

A federal judge has denied a Baltimore man's motion to unseal court documents from a political corruption case against former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell.

"The motion is procedurally defective," the case has been closed and the man filing, William Bond, is "not entitled to have any documents unsealed," U.S. District Judge J. Frederick Motz wrote in an opinion filed Thursday.

The documents Bond sought referred to criminal activity alleged against a third party.

Bond, who plans to appeal the decision, said in an interview that he filed the motion to prove a point about a "continuing pattern of behavior of ethical misconduct" by an attorney he's dealt with in a copyright infringement case. Bond filed that suit after his unpublished autobiographical manuscript, Self-Portrait of a Patricide: How I Got Away With Murder, was used against him in a custody battle with his wife.

FOR THE RECORD - An article Saturday incorrectly characterized the court use of William C. Bond's unpublished manuscript Self-Portrait of a Patricide: How I Got Away With Murder. It was not used in a custody battle with Bond, but in a custody battle between his wife and her ex-husband.
The Baltimore Sun regrets the error.

When he was 17, Bond, formerly known as William Rovtar, beat his father to death with a hammer, pleaded guilty and was treated at Sheppard and Enoch Pratt Hospital in Baltimore, according to court records. He later wrote the manuscript, which "describes in horrific detail how Bond planned and committed the murder of his father," court papers say. Bond has said the work was "highly fictionalized."

He has no other connection to Bromwell, who pleaded guilty in 2007 to racketeering conspiracy and was sentenced to seven years in prison.

Some had hoped the documents, if unsealed, would shed light on certain events in the Bromwell case, including why two lawyers dropped out a week before jury selection was to begin. At the time, Motz said it was because of "irreconcilable conflicts of interest."

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