Other Notable Deaths

OTHER NOTABLE DEATHS

July 18, 2009

JUDI ANN MASON, 54

'Good Times' writer

Judi Ann Mason, who wrote for the TV sitcom Good Times and other shows, died July 8 in Los Angeles of a ruptured aorta, the Los Angeles Times reported.

The Louisiana native was in college when her first play was produced. She wrote more than two dozen others.

Her screenwriting career began after her 1977 graduation with Good Times. She later held executive writing positions on A Different World, I'll Fly Away and Generations.

Ms. Mason also co-wrote the 1993 movie Sister Act 2: Back in the Habit.

CAL OLSON, 84

Pulitzer-prize winning photographer

Cal Olson, a former managing editor, photographer and a member of the Fargo, N.D., Forum team awarded a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of a deadly 1957 tornado, died Thursday after falling at his cabin on Big Island Lake in Itasca County, Minn., and striking his head. The newspaper said he died at a Duluth, Minn., hospital.

Mr. Olson's photo of a man carrying a lifeless child told the story of the 1957 Fargo tornado.

He served two terms as president of the National Press Photographers Association.

He joined The Forum staff in 1950 as a reporter and photographer and was named photo chief in 1957. He later became city editor and, in 1972, managing editor. He left The Forum in 1978, and became editor of the Sioux City (Iowa) Journal. He retired 19 years ago.

JULIUS SHULMAN, 98

Photographer

Julius Shulman, a photographer who turned photos of modernist buildings into works of art, died Wednesday at his home in the Hollywood Hills of Southern California.

Mr. Shulman had more than 260,000 images in his archive when it was purchased by the Getty Center in 1995.

Mr. Shulman's photos at one time sold for less than $50 each, but in later years, his photos were considered art and they brought between $2,000 and $20,000. He later collaborated with Juergen Nogai and worked late into his 90s.

His most famous work was called Case Study House No. 22, a black and white photo of a glass and steel home built by architect Pierre Koenig in the Hollywood Hills.

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