Ronald Burton Dowell, Accountant

July 16, 2009|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

Ronald Burton Dowell, a retired certified public accountant and former president of the St. Andrew's Society of Baltimore, died from lung cancer July 3 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The former longtime Towson resident was 82.

Mr. Dowell was born and raised in Glasgow, Scotland, where he graduated from the High School of Glasgow in 1945.

After serving from 1945 to 1948 in the Scots Guards, where he attained the rank of sergeant, he earned an accounting certificate from Glasgow University in 1950.

In 1952, Mr. Dowell moved to the island of Jamaica, where he worked as an accountant, and then to Geneva, as an accountant for an international grain corporation.

He moved to Towson in 1967, when he joined the Baltimore accounting firm of Main Lafrentz & Co., which later became Main Hurdman and KPMG.

He was named a partner in 1970, and retired from the company in 1986. He was a member of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants and the Institute of Management Accountants.

Mr. Dowell, who became a U.S. citizen in 1973, had been a board member, treasurer and president of the St. Andrew's Society of Baltimore.

He was a lifelong golfer, boater and bicyclist and did extensive cycling tours of England, France, Spain, Italy and New Zealand.

Mr. Dowell, who had moved to Fallston, was a communicant of Trinity Episcopal Church in Towson, where he had been a member of the vestry and church treasurer.

Services were held at his church on Monday.

Surviving are two sons, Michael Dowell of Arlington, Va., and Ian Dowell of Bridgeport, Conn.; two daughters, Kirstie Durr of Fallston and Lynne Dowell of Timonium; a brother, Alexander Dowell of Surrey, England; a sister, Nora Thomson of Pebble, Scotland; six grandchildren; and his companion, Anne Canfield of Timonium. He was separated from his wife of 50 years, the former Lynne Toombs.

-Frederick N. Rasmussen

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