A's, O. Cabrera agree

Bonds' trial delayed

Baseball Notes

March 03, 2009|By From Sun news services

The Oakland Athletics and free agent Orlando Cabrera have agreed to a one-year, $4 million contract, several media outlets reported, likely ending Bobby Crosby's disappointing tenure as the starting shortstop.

The deal is contingent on Cabrera's passing a physical.

Cabrera, 34, a two-time Gold Glove winner, hit .281 with eight homers and 57 RBIs in 161 games with the Chicago White Sox last season.

The 12-year veteran is the third significant addition the A's have made to the lineup since last season, joining outfielder Matt Holliday and designated hitter Jason Giambi.

Crosby, the 2004 American League Rookie of the Year, finished with an on-base percentage under .300 in each of the past three years.

Bonds:: The perjury trial of Barry Bonds has been delayed at least through July and likely beyond, as an appeal filed by prosecutors over three positive drug tests and other key evidence for the trial winds through the legal system.

Yankees:: Alex Rodriguez says he's happy to put behind him a meeting with baseball officials about his use of steroids more than five years ago. The slugger reported to the Dominican Republic team and took part in its first workout in preparation for the World Baseball Classic. The practice came a day after Rodriguez met for two hours with Major League Baseball officials about his positive drug tests in 2001-2003 while with the Rangers. "It's really good to get yesterday behind me ... " Rodriguez said. "For me, now the focus is the WBC." Rodriguez declined to say what happened at the meeting or whether he expects any follow-up.

Nationals: : Five weeks before the start of the season, Jim Bowden resigned as general manager. So exactly who is calling the shots on personnel moves until a successor is chosen? For now, it's team president Stan Kasten. "I'm in charge," Kasten said. Kasten reiterated that it would be "later this week" before any replacement would be picked.

Obituary:: Tom Sturdivant, 78, who pitched the Yankees to victory in Game 4 of the 1956 World Series on the day before Don Larsen's famed perfect game, died Saturday in Oklahoma City. Sturdivant finished his 10-year career in 1964 with a record of 59-51 and a 3.74 ERA.

Et cetera: : Tigers manager Jim Leyland said Jeremy Bonderman, who was sent back to Detroit because of medical concerns about his pitching shoulder, is fine and will be back on the mound before the team goes north in about five weeks. ... Rangers slugger Josh Hamilton is expected to return to the lineup tomorrow after two days of recovery time for his strained left Achilles tendon. ... Padres closer Heath Bell and Pirates reliever John Grabow were added to the United States' World Baseball Classic roster.

Baltimore Sun Articles
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.