Duke men back on top of AP poll

Terps women rise to No. 8 as ACC honors Coleman, Kizer

Oklahoma men beat Okla. State, 89-81

College Basketball

January 27, 2009|By From Sun staff and news services

The Duke men returned to the top of the Associated Press college basketball poll yesterday, a place the Blue Devils have grown to know well.

The Blue Devils (18-1) moved up one spot to No. 1, their first appearance there since the final poll of 2005-06. They were ranked on top for at least one week in every season from 1997-98 to 2003-04.

"When you have a chance to be voted No. 1 at any time, it is an honor you don't take lightly," Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski said yesterday.

AP women's poll: : Connecticut was the unanimous top choice for the ninth straight week, Maryland rose four spots to No. 8 and North Carolina slid from second to 10th.

The Terps (16-3, 4-1 Atlantic Coast Conference) played their only game of the week Sunday, a 77-71 victory over the Tar Heels in College Park.

Postseason tournament: : A new men's single-elimination tournament has been scheduled in March by CollegeInsider.com for 16 teams not chosen for the NCAA and National Invitation tournaments.

Maryland: : Marissa Coleman won her fourth ACC Player of the Week award this year, and Lynetta Kizer earned Rookie of the Week for helping the Terps beat the Tar Heels.

Alabama: : Mark Gottfried quit as men's coach after 11 seasons, and the school said assistant Phillip Pearson will take over as interim coach.

Top 25 men

No. 4 Oklahoma 89, Oklahoma State 81: : Blake Griffin scored 20 of his 26 points in the second half, and the visiting Sooners (20-1, 6-0 Big 12) survived a three-point onslaught by the Cowboys (13-6, 2-3).

No. 8 Marquette 71, Notre Dame 64: : Jerel McNeal had a season-high 27 points to send the Fighting Irish (12-7, 3-5 Big East) to their fourth straight loss and second straight at home.

The Golden Eagles (18-2, 7-0) have won 10 straight.

Top 25 women

No. 1 Connecticut 93, No. 6 Louisville 65: : Maya Moore had 27 points and 11 rebounds, freshman Tiffany Hayes added a career-high 23 points, and the host Huskies (20-0, 6-0 Big East) won despite All-American Angel McCoughtry (St. Frances), who had 24 points and 13 rebounds for the Cardinals (19-2, 6-1).

No. 19 Virginia 75, Clemson 67: : Lyndra Littles had 15 of her 22 points in the second half, and the visiting Cavaliers (16-4, 3-2), who host Maryland on Friday, won their sixth straight over the Tigers (12-9, 2-5).

State men

BETHUNE-COOKMAN 58, UMES 55:: The host Hawks (5-12, 2-4 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) had a chance to tie with four seconds left but failed to get a shot off in their loss to the Wildcats (11-9, 5-2).

GETTYSBURG 71, JOHNS HOPKINS 62:: The Blue Jays (11-6, 6-4 Centennial) grabbed an early lead but couldn't hold on against the host Bullets (13-3, 8-2).

DICKINSON 68, MCDANIEL 58:: The Green Terror (12-5, 7-3 Centennial) squandered a 12-point halftime lead against the host Red Devils (8-7, 3-7). Josh McKay (Eastern Tech) had 17 points to lead McDaniel.

HAVERFORD 59, WASHINGTON COLLEGE 57:: Sam Permutt (Atholton) hit a layup with 1.5 seconds left to give the visiting Fords (7-9, 4-6 Centennial) the win over the Shoremen (7-10, 4-6).

State women

COPPIN STATE 61, HOWARD 46:: The Eagles (6-11, 5-2 MEAC) had three players score in double figures in their win over the visiting Bison (3-15, 2-4). Shante Cummings had 20 points for Coppin.

MORGAN STATE 77, HAMPTON 55:: Corin Adams led all scorers with 25 points as the Lady Bears (13-6, 5-2 MEAC) built an 11-point halftime lead in their win over the visiting Lady Pirates (6-11, 3-3).

UMES 72, BETHUNE-COOKMAN 65:: April McBride and Tiffany Reid each had 22 points to lead the Lady Hawks (8-9, 4-2 MEAC) past the visiting Lady Wildcats (7-10, 1-6 MEAC).

CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE 60, MOUNT ST. MARY'S 47:: Brianna Gauthier (St. Mary's) paced the Mount (7-11, 2-7 Northeast Conference) with 15 points and seven rebounds but it came in a losing effort.

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