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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Diane Holloway and Diane Holloway,COX NEWS SERVICE | January 30, 2003
Biff Henderson's evolution from stage manager to star began one morning in 1980, when David Letterman was in the midst of his own transformation from wise-cracking comic to talk show host. NBC had the gap-toothed guy, a favorite guest on Johnny Carson's Tonight Show, working as host of a morning show, which was a strange place for Letterman's late-night sense of humor. (This was the show on which Letterman set fire to the stage.) Henderson was stage managing in the wings when Letterman, on his way to do the monologue, suddenly pushed the startled stage manager toward the spotlight.
NEWS
June 20, 2003
William Frank Carouge Jr., a longtime pharmacist, died of cancer Wednesday at Monroe Regional Medical Center in Ocala, Fla. The former Cockeysville resident was 74. Born in Baltimore and raised in Hamilton, he was a 1946 graduate of Polytechnic Institute. He earned a degree at the University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, and was a member of the University of Maryland Alumni Association and Zeta Eta Theta Fraternity. In the 1950s, he began working at the York-Seminary Pharmacy in Lutherville and later worked at the Darlington Pharmacy in Harford County.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | March 5, 2003
NEW YORK - Credit Suisse First Boston said yesterday that Frank Quattrone, whose Silicon Valley office managed the most computer-related share sales at the height of the Internet boom, has resigned as he faces government probes of allegations he destroyed documents to obstruct an investigation. Quattrone was suspended last month after the unit of Switzerland's second-largest bank discovered evidence he knew the firm was under investigation when he told his staff to "clean up" its files.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2003
John C. Martello Sr., second-generation owner of Martello Knife Service Inc., died of a heart attack Sunday at his Bel Air home. He was 76. Mr. Martello was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., the son of immigrant parents from Pinzolo, Italy. His father, who learned knife-sharpening in Italy, moved his family in 1929 to the 1300 block of N. Broadway, when he established Martello Brothers Knife Service in Baltimore. The elder Martello outfitted a red truck with a grinding wheel and other necessary equipment and visited city markets to service the knives of merchants.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 28, 2003
About 12 years ago, Ray Jordan was looking for space to locate his nonprofit organization when he walked into an industrial building on Red Branch Road in Columbia and saw a large indoor pool that no one appeared to want. "No one knew what to do with the building because of the pool, and as soon as I saw it, I said, `That's perfect for young people. They'd really enjoy this,'" said Jordan, founder and executive director of Athelas Institute, a program that provides services for developmentally disabled adults.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Nathan M. Pitts | May 1, 2003
An update on the concert scene: newly announced shows and ticket availability. For ticket information and purchase, call Ticketmaster at 410-481-SEAT unless otherwise noted. Just announced Matchbox Twenty, Sugar Ray and Maroon 5 will perform at the MCI Center May 16. Mix Fest, featuring Uncle Cracker, O.A.R., Macy Gray, Sixpence None the Richer, Chantal Kreviazuk, Rachel Farris, Ike and guest host Lisa Marie Presley, will be held at Pier Six Concert Pavilion June 7. 50 Cent, Jay-Z, Missy Elliott, Busta Rhymes and Fabolous play Nissan Pavilion in Manassas, Va., July 6. David Sanborn performs at the Rams Head Tavern in Annapolis Oct. 5. Also, Arlo Guthrie is there Nov. 18-19.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2003
EXMORE, Va. - Dressed head to toe in black - cotton blouse, jeans, knee-length duster - Sara Baldwin looks as if she could have stepped from a New York gallery or design studio. Instead, the 36-year-old artist/entrepreneur, apparently unconcerned about the coat of white granite residue that covers the sprawling production floor at New Ravenna Mosaics, is on her hands and knees with half a dozen workers. A looming deadline for a delivery to Washington has her husband, Eyre, alternately pacing and stepping outside to puff on cigarettes, but she carefully directs the finishing touches to the intricate pattern of the medallion that will soon accent a refurbished U.S. Senate fitness center.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2003
Dr. Charlotte Silverman, a Johns Hopkins epidemiologist who studied a broad spectrum of public health issues, died of congestive heart failure Thursday at Suburban Hospital in Bethesda. A Bethesda resident, she had lived for many years in Glen Arm. She was 89. Born in New York City, Dr. Silverman, who earned a degree in 1933 from Brooklyn College, was a graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Family members said she then pursued an interest in public health issues after the death of her father, Harry Silverman, who succumbed to tuberculosis.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | February 28, 2003
Columbia tennis players are lobbying the Columbia Association for a permanent indoor tennis facility after the bubble covering five courts at Owen Brown Tennis Club collapsed during last week's snowstorm. Through an e-mail campaign, tennis players are telling association officials that their indoor playing facilities are now cut in half, and the bubble should be replaced with a permanent structure. But that is not likely to happen soon. The association plans to repair and re-inflate the bubble within two months.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
Dr. J. Alan Baldanza, a well-known Baltimore County internist and former medical educator, died of a heart attack Saturday while playing tennis at the Springdale neighborhood tennis courts in Cockeysville. He was 58. For the past 27 years, Dr. Baldanza, who lived in Cockeysville, had practiced medicine in a 100-year-old York Road shingled, tan-colored house he had purchased and converted into a medical office. Born in Passaic, N.J., and raised in Clifton, N.J., Dr. Baldanza was the son of a milkman and grandson of immigrants from Sicily.
NEWS
January 3, 2003
253 - The number of murders or unjustified homicides in Baltimore City last year. In 2001, the city had recorded 256 murders. Source: Baltimore City Police Department
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2003
A Baltimore native who has a long association with private schools in the city as a student, teacher and administrator has been named the new headmaster at the Calvert School. Andrew D. Martire, 32, the upper school head at the Ranney School in Tinton Falls, N.J., was selected by Calvert's board of trustees to replace Merrill S. Hall III, who is retiring at the end of June after 20 years as head of the school. "I'm very excited about coming back," Martire said. "To me, being headmaster at Calvert is a wonderful opportunity."
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2003
A Carroll County man sentenced more than two decades ago to life in prison in the shooting death of a 17-year-old Finksburg girl went to court yesterday to ask for a new trial, arguing that his lawyer in the case failed to adequately represent him. Through his attorney, Cecil L. Redman Jr. also asked that his sentence be reduced, complaining that his lawyer should have been able to negotiate a plea agreement with less prison time. Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. did not immediately rule on the request.
NEWS
By Walter F. Roche Jr. and Walter F. Roche Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 10, 2003
A federal immigration judge who presides over sensitive visa and deportation cases sought a financial partnership with a Virginia firm whose clients could end up before him in court, according to a tape recording seized in a government raid. Judge D. Anthony Rogers' conduct appears to violate federal conflict of interest regulations and prompted a memo in March from an investigator for the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service expressing exasperation that Rogers remains on the bench in Dallas.
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