Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Jack Hagel and By Jack Hagel,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - When he discovered his son, David, had crudely altered his report card to turn D's into B's, Jeffrey M. Gloss had a thought that occurs to a lot of parents: military school. In Gloss' case, he followed through. "Our son was in a situation where he was about to travel down the slippery slope," said Gloss, explaining why he took David out of Philadelphia's Lower Merion High School and enrolled him at Valley Forge Military Academy four years ago. David Gloss' application to Valley Forge turns out to have corresponded with a surge of interest in military prep schools.
NEWS
By Christina Bittner and Christina Bittner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 9, 2001
IN BROOKLYN Park in the 1950s, meeting rock 'n' roll celebrities, making public appearances at dances, having people ask for your autograph and being one of the all-important committee members on the Buddy Deane television show was the ultimate teen dream. But for one Brooklyn Park native, that was reality. John Sankonis' love for music and drumming enabled him to do all that and more. He has played drums for more 1950s teen idols than most of us can remember. "I've played for Fats Domino, Dion, Chuck Berry, Little Anthony, Wolfman Jack, Fabian, Gene Pitney, The Coasters, The Platters, Chubby Checker, Bobby Lewis, Frankie Ford, Danny & the Juniors, Gary U.S. Bonds, Blood Sweat and Tears, The Mamas & The Papas, Leslie Gore and Archie Bell.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
Fearing a ruling that could lead to firefighters losing child custody because of their unusual work schedules, firefighters around the country are watching a custody dispute between a firefighter and his former wife that comes before Maryland's second-highest court today. A District of Columbia firefighter from Lanham is asking the Court of Special Appeals to overturn a Prince George's County Circuit judge's order that ended joint custody of his two children, ages 5 and 6. The lower court ruled against Lt. Gerald E. Burton because he had told the judge his work hours changed to meet the custody arrangement, but officially they had not. Instead, he had relied on a longtime practice among firefighters of swapping hours to meet the custody agreement.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun Staff | April 5, 2001
The lack of power in the Orioles' lineup extended to Camden Yards last night, bringing a 43-minute delay before their game against the Boston Red Sox. A Baltimore Gas & Electric dedicated feeder line that provides electrical power only to the ballpark over-heated, stopping the flow of electricity and causing the sound system, lights and both scoreboards to go out while the Orioles were taking batting practice around 5:20 p.m. Most of the B&O warehouse also...
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
Some arrive after spouses and children have gone to bed, to ward off the loneliness and temptation that beckon them back to a world they worked so hard to leave behind. Others stop off when they finish their late shifts at work, or when they're done with dinner, sometimes remaining until it's time for breakfast. A few show up from the streets, straight from the drug corners and crack houses. Dee's Place, the city's only seven-day-a-week, dusk-to-dawn drug recovery center, has logged more than 21,000 visits from former and current addicts since it opened in East Baltimore seven months ago. Named for its matriarch and manager, Delois A. "Dee" Sparks, a longtime community activist and former drug addict, the privately funded center operates in borrowed space on a street where half the houses are boarded and empty.
NEWS
By Vikki Valentine and Vikki Valentine,Special to the Sun | May 20, 2001
It's a quiet, drizzly Sunday morning when the Jet Set motor scooter gang roars onto Roland Avenue. Roland Park residents heading for church turn to look, disturbed and confused, as the group putt-putts by, clad in Speed Racer-esque coats and riding a mix of shiny white, black, blue and wasabi-green scoots. The gang is made up of guys between the ages of 16 and 35. Some are married, some are fathers, and some are single. All are slightly insane. A few scooter babes are riding on the back of the bikes, hugging their drivers tight as they head for the first big group ride of the spring.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 29, 2001
Richard Waybright still wears a blue-and-white striped work shirt with his first name sewn on the pocket. It's one of the few links to the days more than 50 years ago when he and his brother, Horace, milked 12 cows by hand on their Pennsylvania farm. Now Richard and his family operate Mason Dixon Farms Inc., one of the Northeast's largest and most technologically advanced dairy operations, which milks 2,100 cows three times a day. Mason Dixon is to the average dairy farm what New York is to the average American town.
BUSINESS
August 26, 2001
Miss Utility `Ticket Check' available to contractors Before embarking on excavation or demolition projects, contractors in Maryland are required to check with utility owners to see if lines run beneath the ground where they plan to work, according to recently enacted state law. Contractors can call Miss Utility of Maryland's "Ticket Check" - a free automated information service verifying that utility lines have been marked. Contractors must call at least two days before digging. Penalties for violating the law include paying for repair costs and civil penalties up to $1,000 per violation for the first offense, plus up to 10 times the actual cost of repairs.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | January 20, 2001
Lying in the back of an ambulance, hours from death, a wounded Andre Darnell Samuel told police the name of the suspect in a bizarre arson-and-shooting attack that destroyed his family's home and left his grandmother critically burned. Yesterday, police charged a suspect - the man named by Samuel in the attack early Thursday at the family's Anne Arundel County home - with first-degree murder and arson, authorities said. Kevin Hartford Bass, 28, of the 2100 block of Tucker Lane in Baltimore was taken into custody Thursday evening in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 13, 2001
William T. Phillips, a retired launch operator for the Association of Maryland Pilots and former owner of the Chester Peake, the famed skipjack that sailed the bay as a goodwill ambassador for the National Brewing Co., died Monday of a heart attack at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 73. The 40-year South Ellwood Avenue resident, who was born into a family of tugboat and barge operators, got his first taste of the waterfront as a youth. "His one uncle had tugboats at the foot of Wolfe Street, and another had barges near the old Arundel Co. cement plant in Fells Point, and that's where Bill was introduced to working and running boats as a teen-ager.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | August 14, 2001
A murdered Glen Burnie pharmacist whose body was found Sunday in Southwest Baltimore was targeted by four attackers who followed the woman's car and then kidnapped her at gunpoint near her home, city police said. It was a crude scheme to car-jack and rob someone, police said, that began in a quiet suburban neighborhood and ended with the death of Yvette A. Beakes, 26. In court papers and interviews yesterday, city police laid out this version of events: About 11 p.m. Wednesday, Beakes left Pickles Pub near Camden Yards and drove home.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | August 31, 2001
Feeling that its stock is undervalued, McCormick & Co. said yesterday that it will begin listing its voting shares on the New York Stock Exchange this fall. The more widely traded nonvoting shares have been on the NYSE since May 1999, when they moved from the Nasdaq stock market. But the voting shares -held mainly by employees and retirees - are traded on the bulletin board, or pink sheets. The two stocks, which pay the same dividends, historically trade at about equal prices. But this year they have charted different courses.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley | March 21, 2001
Severn School and South River have matured to make them the teams to beat going into the 2001 Anne Arundel County boys lacrosse season. Severn's slew of quality veterans bodes well for their rugged schedule in the Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference with St. Mary's. Class 3A South River (12-3 last season) returns 13 quality players. In private schools, third-year Severn coach Jamie McNealey, 5-10 last season, feels his nucleus of three-year players are ready. "We invested in sophomores three years ago, and now it's their time," McNealey said.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2001
For more than 60 years, fanciers of the steamed Maryland blue crab trekked every summer to a secluded restaurant on the Bush River near Aberdeen and hammered and picked their way to gastronomical nirvana. They traveled to Gabler's Shore Restaurant from New York, Philadelphia and Washington in kind of a cultural homage to the model crab emporium not available in Queens or South Philly. And they traveled from the local crab capitals along Eastern Avenue and Belair Road. But these are sad days around Harford County.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2001
Walter Kwarta, a former restaurateur and union official, died Tuesday of complications of pancreatitis at Franklin Square Hospital Center. He was 62 and lived in Middle River. Until he sold the business in the mid-1990s, he operated River Watch Restaurant and Marina, a 400-seat establishment overlooking Hopkins Creek in the Middleborough section of eastern Baltimore County. He was also a longshoreman who drove a tractor on the docks of the Port of Baltimore from the 1950s through the 1970s.
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.