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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 2, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - Before firing Peter Arnett - the Tokyo Rose of our time - NBC issued a ludicrous statement defending Mr. Arnett's interview on Iraqi TV as a "professional courtesy." When the condemnations started rolling in, NBC saw the handwriting on the ratings wall and quickly cut him loose. NBC News President Neal Shapiro said, "It was wrong for Mr. Arnett to grant an interview to state-controlled Iraqi TV - especially at a time of war - and it was wrong for him to discuss his personal observations and opinions in that interview."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
George Phelps Fondersmith Jr., an artist and former advertising executive who was the founder and director of the Baltimore Life Gallery, died of pneumonia Wednesday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 85. Mr. Fondersmith was born in Philadelphia and raised in Elkins Park, Pa., and was a graduate of Cheltenham High School. He studied at the Art Students' League of New York and the Philadelphia College of Art. During World War II, he served as an Army master sergeant at Aberdeen Proving Ground, where he headed its art department.
SPORTS
By Danny Baker and Danny Baker,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2003
Guy Jones knows how hard it can be to successfully sail the open ocean. Having sailed since 1973, the Michigan-born Vietnam War veteran has encountered rapidly changing weather, rough waves and navigational duties that have challenged his capabilities as a skipper. However, these have been just choppy waters for a man who has been through much more. Jones, recently captained his 40-foot cutter, Gorgeous Girl, to first place overall and first place in its class in the 14th Marion-Bermuda Cruising Yacht Race from Marion, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Staff | November 2, 2003
The Man Who Tried to Buy the World, by Jo Johnson and Martine Orange. Portfolio. 288 pages. $25.95. For voyeurs of financial and managerial disasters, recent U.S. corporate scandals have raised the blinds on some fabulous romps. Perhaps we are sated. What could be more entertaining than Tyco's $2,200 wastebasket, WorldCom's vanishing expense entries or Enron's rigging of the California energy market? Here's what: The traditional venality of Wall Street -- plus the grandiosity of Hollywood.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,special to the sun | August 17, 2003
When John Danzer was an adolescent, he was known as the "yard boy of Roland Park." The founder of Adam and Eve lawn service, he cut most of his neighbors' lawns and, by all accounts, was quite good at his job. In fact, he prospered sufficiently to buy himself a red BMW before he was old enough to have a driver's license. One can mow only so many yards, though, before one begins to notice what's placed in or on the grass. "My mother was a big gardener, and grew everything from snapdragons to peonies.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
English and reading department chairwoman Wendy Prioleau sat in the Woodlawn Middle School library after the building had emptied of pupils recently and underlined a handout on the virtues of teamwork. Prioleau was joined by more than a dozen colleagues who have also become accustomed to the after-school coursework in group decision-making and togetherness. These weekly sessions are part of Woodlawn Middle's efforts at school improvement, which Principal Jerilyn C. Roberts has instituted to revive a school that is on the brink of a state takeover after years of low test scores and pupil violence.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 3, 2003
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - The reclusive South African writer J.M. Coetzee, whose novels explore his country's painful history of apartheid and continuing anguish since the end of white supremacy, was awarded this year's Nobel Prize in literature yesterday by the Swedish Academy. The academy cited Coetzee's writings, including the novels Waiting for the Barbarians, Life and Times of Michael K and Disgrace, for "their well-crafted composition, pregnant dialogue and analytical brilliance."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE COURANT | September 18, 2003
TORONTO -- A year ago, Alison Lohman arrived at the Toronto International Film Festival as an unknown in an actress-loaded movie called White Oleander. But her performance as a foster child who takes abuse at every stop overshadowed the stars, Michelle Pfeiffer, Robin Wright Penn and Renee Zellweger. "I remember they had me in a limo," Lohman says in a recent interview here, "and I freaked out, tears rolling down my cheek and having to get out of the limo and just walk there because I couldn't deal with the limo and the premiere and the dress.
NEWS
By Kewannah Wallace and Kewannah Wallace,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2003
Though his area of command was the Shenandoah Valley and parts of western Virginia, Confederate Maj. Harry Gilmor was ordered to destroy communication lines into and out of his hometown, Baltimore, during Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's 1864 invasion of Maryland. On July 8, 1864, Confederate Maj. Gen. Bradley T. Johnson met with Early and was told that he was to lead his brigade toward Baltimore. North of the city, Johnson would have to interrupt railroad movement. Along the way, he would also have to sever telegraph lines.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2003
Dear Mr. Azrael: I own a townhouse as an investment property with a Federal Housing Administration mortgage at 7.25 percent. The loan-to-value ratio is 60. I have been getting frequent solicitations regarding "streamline financing" to a lower rate. The loan officer informs me that there are minimal costs involved in this type of refinancing and that the lending company will pay these costs in exchange for the business of reselling the loan on the secondary market. Could there be hidden fees that I'm not being told about?
NEWS
By Alyson R. Klein and Alyson R. Klein,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2003
A Baltimore County Circuit Court jury convicted Clarence Conyers of two counts of first-degree murder yesterday, forcing him to face the possibility of a death sentence for the third time in nearly a decade. Conyers, 35, was convicted for the second time in the October 1994 slayings of Wanda Johnson, 44, and Lawrence Bradshaw, 22, both of northwest Baltimore County. He will be sentenced today. Conyers has already been sentenced to death twice for killing Johnson and Bradshaw, but the first two sentences and his original conviction were overturned on appeal.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 8, 2003
There's a chance that an Exxon Mobil Speedpass could shut down a car. There's only a slight chance that will happen, and there's a way to prevent it, so there's no need to banish the Speedpass from the key chain. But the little-known flaw, caused by radio frequency transmissions, shows how the increasing amount of data being sent through the air might create problems. The Speedpass, which was introduced in 1997, uses a tiny chip to transmit customer payment data to the pump at the gas station.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | June 15, 2003
Ira C. Rigger saw the future and it was deep. As deep as the deep end in a neighborhood pool in the suburban frontier, circa 1954. It was a time when subdivisions, housing developments, and middle-class castles were quickly multiplying, and some residents sought to control whom they and their families recreated with. The Supreme Court had ruled in Brown vs. Board of Education that schools must desegregate, and it was inevitable that other public facilities, including pools, would be required to open their doors to African-Americans as well.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2003
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- If there were any lingering questions about the health of Maryland wide receiver Derrick Fenner, he answered them near the end of the Terps' first Gator Bowl practice yesterday at Jacksonville University. Fenner, who missed the last three weeks of the regular season after having his appendix removed, grabbed an 80-yard touchdown pass from quarterback Scott McBrien during Maryland's two-minute offense, and looked as fast as ever. His return should give the Terps an additional deep threat when they meet West Virginia on Thursday.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2003
John W. Simmons Jr., a lacrosse standout at the University of Maryland who for 35 years was a private certified public accountant, died Tuesday at his Annapolis home from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, better known as Lou Gehrig's disease. He was 69. Born in Annapolis, Mr. Simmons attended public schools there and graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1956 with a degree in accounting. While there, he was a starting defenseman for four years on the university's lacrosse team.
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