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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1998
For five years, Richard Huss, principal of Charles Carroll Elementary School, has asked the county school board to appoint an assistant principal to his school.The response was always the same: Charles Carroll doesn't have enough students to justify a second administrator.That answer may change if the school board adopts a proposal to put more assistant principals at the county's smallest and largest schools. The school board is expected to vote on the staff recommendation at its meeting June 10.Under the revised guidelines, Charles Carroll, the smallest county school with 376 students, would be eligible for a part-time assistant principal.
NEWS
By This article was reported by Gady Epstein, Caitlin Francke in Florida, Michael James, Steve Kreytak, Edward Lee, Erika Peterman, Stan Rappaport, Erin Texeira, Craig Timberg and Del Quentin Wilber. It was written by James | April 18, 1998
A spring break beach trip to Florida for three Columbia friends culminated in a knife and baseball bat attack at an ocean-side resort that left two of the men dead and a third critically injured with 17 stab wounds, Florida authorities reported yesterday.The victims -- all graduates of Oakland Mills High School -- had gone to New Smyrna Beach as part of a nine-day trip when the deadly fight broke out Thursday night with four other men.Police reported some of the stabbing victims were also clubbed with baseball bats.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 28, 1998
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks rose to records for a third day yesterday, sending the Dow Jones industrial average to its first close above 8,500, on expectations that corporate profits will grow faster than forecast this year.J. P. Morgan & Co. and Dell Computer Corp. led the advance, along with oil producers Mobil Corp. and Atlantic Richfield Co., which have lagged the market for six months.The Dow rose 55.05 to a record 8,545.72, and the Standard & Poor's 500 Index rose 0.67 to 1,049.34, also a record.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS Sun staff writers Sandy Banisky, C. Fraser Smith, Craig Timberg, Neil Thompson, Laura Lippman and Stephen Henderson contributed to this article | July 4, 1998
Louis L. Goldstein, the jovial political institution who began campaigning last week for an 11th term as Maryland comptroller with his cheery trademark, "God bless y'all real good," collapsed at his home in Prince Frederick, Calvert County, last night and died.Mr. Goldstein, who was first elected to political office in 1938 and served in statewide office longer than anyone else in Maryland history, was 85 years old.Earlier in the evening yesterday, Mr. Goldstein and members of his family had observed an Independence Day tradition, reading from the Declaration of Independence, according to Marvin Bond, the comptroller's longtime assistant.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1998
In the first criminal charge to result from the three-year Justice Department investigation of the tobacco industry, a California biotechnology company admitted yesterday that it illegally conspired with cigarette maker Brown & Williamson to develop a high-nicotine tobacco.People familiar with the continuing federal probe said the relatively minor charge against DNA Plant Technology Corp. -- that it violated a tobacco seed-export law that has since been repealed -- has ominous implications for Brown & Williamson and for the industry as a whole.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
A woman and her daughter were found shot to death yesterday afternoon inside their East Baltimore apartment. A 3-year-old girl was found cowering but unharmed at the shooting scene.The bodies of Tamara Chester, 38, and her daughter, Tiffany Skinner, 20, were discovered about 2: 15 p.m. by a family friend who police said went into the house after discovering the child standing in a doorway.Homicide detectives said they had several leads and a possible suspect who knew the victims. Police said each victim was shot in the head.
NEWS
November 14, 1998
Jefferson's behavior with slave far worse than Clinton's affairAfter reading Pamela Prenger's letter , I didn't know whether to laugh or cry ("Jefferson-Hemings liaison nothing like president's affair," Nov. 8).Ms. Prenger basically wanted to make the point that President Clinton's affair with Monica Lewinsky was a far greater sin than Thomas Jefferson's relationship with Sally Hemings because Jefferson "truly loved her," according to all the biographies she had read about Jefferson.I have no doubt that those biographies claimed that Jefferson loved Hemings.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | January 21, 1998
GET YOUR red-hot doctoral degree while supplies last! Only $179! No attending of classes required! Full credit for life experience! And due to popular demand, we now offer two additional degrees at rock-bottom prices: $139.75 for a master's, $99.75 for a bachelor's.This is the gist of the 18-page catalog of the American College of Metaphysical Theology, a Minnesota-based school specializing in the "study of the basic advanced principles of metaphysical or spiritual truth."You can find the college on the Internet at www.americancollege.
NEWS
By FEDERAL NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 1998
Here are excerpts from President Clinton's interview with PBS' Jim Lehrer:Lehrer: The news of this day is that Kenneth Starr, independent counsel, is investigating allegations that you suborned perjury by encouraging a former White House intern, to lie under oath in a civil deposition about her having had an affair with you.Mr. President, is that true?Clinton: That is not true. That is not true. I did not ask anyone to tell anything other than the truth. There is no improper relationship.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
A former Baltimore County trucking company executive who made large donations to political candidates pleaded guilty yesterday to contempt of court charges involving his fraudulent credit card and bank check use.Brian H. Davis, 52, who is serving a sentence for bank fraud and tax violation in the Federal Correctional Institution at Cumberland, appeared yesterday before U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis. Sentencing for the new charges is set for Oct. 28.Assistant U.S. Attorney Dale P. Kelberman said that Davis engaged in credit card fraud and bank fraud from June to August 1997 -- a period when he'd been convicted and was about to be sent to prison.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1998
U.S. Sens. Barbara A. Mikulski and Paul S. Sarbanes have entered the fray over whether the Federal Trade Commission should require Giant Food Inc. to sell stores in Eldersburg, Westminster and Frederick as part of an antitrust agreement."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 22, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Throughout four decades of Cold War, a great and dangerous game was played out in the shadows.Secret U-2 flights snapped pictures of missile silos. Spies were swapped during late-night rendezvous at Glienicker Bridge in Germany. Phone calls were plucked from Kremlin limousines by roving U.S. eavesdropping satellites.But what took place in the skies and on the ground was rivaled by the little-known espionage beneath the waves. Spies didn't just wear trench coats; they also wore Navy blue.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman and Susan Baer and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- They are the ones who are in a position to know: Did first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton really throw a lamp at her husband as legend has it? Is President Clinton a midnight snacker? What's the first family really like behind closed doors?With access to the president second only to immediate family, the permanent staff of ushers, butlers, cooks, stewards and other White House domestic employees knows the secrets that lurk in the West Wing and executive mansion in any administration.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF Sun researcher Paul M. McCardell contributed to this article | July 19, 1998
We join this tale of intrigue, deserted islands and bird poop a full 141 years and five murders after it began.The setting is tiny, tropical Navassa Island, population zero, a condition understandable to any mariner who has ever approached its unwelcoming bluffs. And our latest installment comes to us courtesy of a peeved Californian named Bill Warren.Warren is convinced he has found a way to lay claim to the island's fallow fortune in guano (bird poop fertilizer) for practically nothing, if only a bunch of inflexible Washington bureaucrats would get out of his way. They, in turn, imply he's got less of a leg to stand on, legally speaking, than Long John Silver.
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