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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2011
Monday was a night of many firsts at Angels Rock Bar. It was the first time the bar, and possibly the United States Bartenders' Guild, presented a cocktail-and-tattoo bartending competition. It was the first time some of the competitors submitted original recipes for a mixing contest. And it was the first time I had judged one. Bartending competitions usually serve two purposes: to plug the brand that sponsors it and the bar that employs the winning bartender. But my goal was an altogether different one: to get to know some of the local bartenders I hadn't yet met. Altogether, 12 Maryland bartenders submitted recipes — and tattoos — for consideration in Monday's contest, and they were narrowed to six, said Sean Wachsman, a spokesman for Tuaca liqueur, which sponsored the contest.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 23, 2011
A group of Clarksville residents trying to block a liquor store from opening in the small shopping center near their upscale neighborhood is finding out just how difficult a task that can be. The residents' large detached homes are just off the east side of Route 108 across the road from the parish center building at St. Louis Roman Catholic Church. The main entry road for the decade-old, 70-home development called Clarks Glen North is Wake Forest Road, and the homes lining it look northward, directly facing the shopping center across a narrow strip of grass and mature pine trees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special To The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
I make no secret of my affinity for small, neighborhood restaurants, the ones that draw character from their surroundings while doing wonders for real estate values. Don't feel like cooking? Walk a few blocks. Priceless. Such places tend to have two things in common: The kitchen's output is far superior to what you'd expect if you were judging the place on its looks; and no matter how tight the seating, they always manage to feel more intimate than cramped. Baba's Kitchen , at the end of a block of rowhouses on Fort Avenue, is such a place.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Jami Grant, director of the forensic science program at the University of Baltimore and mentor to many of Maryland's detectives and crime scene technicians, died Wednesday of pneumonia at a hospital in Flagstaff, Ariz. The Ruxton resident, who was traveling to the Grand Canyon when she became ill, was 51. Mel Laney, a Reisterstown resident and her companion of three years, said Dr. Grant had been in robust health until a cold developed into a rare form of pneumonia that couldn't be brought under control.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2011
Warm, melodic polka music still fills the Polish Home Club in Fells Point every Saturday night, where rounds of the house drink — golden, honey-flavored Krupnik — are passed around the bar and quickly drained. But the decidedly older crowd — one member recalled the first time he walked into the club, still recovering from injuries he sustained fighting in World War II — has thinned as residents from the Polish community die off, with many of their children already having left the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2011
You can thank asparagus. The Baltimore Farmers' Market & Bazaar opens Sunday, its earliest opening date ever. Until 2003, when it was moved up to the first week in May, the opening came in early June. Bill Gilmore, executive director of Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, says the market's earlier opening is a response in part to its increasing popularity. "We've had such a huge increase over the years," Gilmore says. But farmers also pushed for the change. This might sound counterintuitive to marketer-goers whose senses remain dulled until they see the season's first strawberries.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
Three teenage girls were charged as juveniles Thursday with placing prank bomb threat calls to five Harford County public schools, according to the Harford County Sheriff's office. The teens, one 15-year-old and two 14-year-olds, were arrested Thursday after police said the girls placed the bomb threat calls to Bel Air Middle, Bel Air High, Fallston High, Southampton Middle and Patterson Mill High schools on Monday. Police said the incident was a hoax after they searched the schools and found no suspicious devices.
NEWS
April 10, 2011
A 25-year-old man who was shot while waiting for a haircut in a downtown Baltimore barber shop on Saturday died from his wounds, city police said. Shortly before 5 p.m. Saturday, Dwight Taylor, who recently lived in South Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood, was shot by two unidentified men who entered the Focal Point barber shop in the 200 block of W. Saratoga Street. Taylor was transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he died at 6:10 p.m. Saturday, police said. Police did not release information about the suspects or a possible motive in the attack.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2011
A body found in a wooded area in Annapolis Saturday was identified as a man reported missing almost a month ago, Annapolis police said. Dior Lee Curtis, 21, was identified after his body was found by dog walker near the 1000 block of Primrose Road just before noon, police said. His body was badly decomposed and was taken to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner for an autopsy, which did not reveal signs of trauma. Police said the cause of death has not been determined. Police said there does not appear to be any evidence of foul play.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
As former Ravens player Mike Flynn watched with his wife in a Towson courtroom, a judge gave a suspended five-year prison sentence Thursday to a Pikesville woman accused of obtaining $10,000 from the ex-offensive lineman by falsely claiming to need treatment for terminal cancer. Lisa Hoppenstein Cohen, 41, the wife of a chiropractor and the mother of two, was also given three years of supervised probation and must repay the Flynns. She began that process outside the courtroom, doling out $2,000 in cash to Flynn, who then counted it. Cohen was ordered to pay the rest of the money before the conclusion of her probation.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2011
Marni loves her sparkly pink flip-flops and the daily school lessons with her host family. Soon after he arrived on a flight from Ethiopia, Sammy switched his dress shoes for a pair of trendy Nikes that he wears everywhere. Isaac has accessorized with cool sunglasses and is teaching his hosts dance moves. After dental and eye check-ups, Betty is sporting a brighter smile and a new pair of glasses. Five young children, ages 6 to 9, are the first visitors to participate in Welcoming Angels, a new international orphan hosting program, organized by America World Adoption to assist Ethiopian children.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
William Thomas doesn't want anyone to pity him, and he doesn't want to spend his life feeling sorry for himself. Paralyzed from the waist down by a bullet seven years ago in the mayhem of a shooting at Randallstown High School, Thomas will never have the football career he so ardently desired, but he has found another cause: making sure others don't end up like him. Far from conceding defeat to his physical limitations, the 24-year-old former...
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2011
Before the Johns Hopkins University president gives 1,300 graduating students their congratulatory handshake on Thursday, volunteers will give them a cautionary dollop of hand sanitizer. "What can I say? We're a health-conscious university," said Dennis O'Shea, spokesman for Hopkins. Since the influenza epidemic of 2009, gel disinfectant has been spreading around schools like strep on throats. Yet there's little scientific evidence that harmful bacteria are passed through a casual squeeze of the hands during commencement.
NEWS
June 2, 2011
In reference to Andrea Siegel 's article "Grieving mom works to help other youths" (May 30), it is sad and disturbing to witness or hear about teenage gangs who are involved in unacceptable behavior in their conflicts with other gangs or innocent bystanders. While I'm sure our justice system strives to controls this problem, in my opinion society has a responsibility to initiate a more effective rehabilitation program to salvage the lives of these troubled teenagers before they graduate into full fledged adult criminals, hence becoming a heavy liability to our communities, not only as a danger to others, but also as a burden to our justice system through their arrests, court trials, and prisons terms where they will associate with hardened criminals and upon their release start the cycle all over again.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2011
A year ago, Washington marketing associate Tara Miller felt lucky just to have a job in her field. So while she wanted to work in Baltimore — where she could be closer to her boyfriend — Miller stayed put at her job in D.C. But by March of this year, she was feeling antsy. "I was poking around and ended up seeing some openings," including an account executive position at Himmelrich PR in Baltimore, Miller said. "I threw in my resume and ended up getting it," she said.
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