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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By NEWSDAY | October 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - They have been called ethnic cleansers, rapists, thieves and thugs. But in the war against terrorism, soldiers of the Northern Alliance are being described as something else by the Bush administration: potential friends. Washington is working cautiously with the alliance to root out Osama bin Laden and Afghanistan's ruling Taliban, a group with an atrocious human rights record. However, some rights advocates and political analysts say that President Bush, in his zeal to capture the key suspect in the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks, may be fighting evil with evil by depending on the Northern Alliance.
NEWS
By Dennis Bishop and Dennis Bishop,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 5, 2001
Q. My mulched beds have small brightly colored mounds of what looks like a fungus growing on them, but they are dry. Is it a fungus and will it harm my plants? A. The odd looking organism you have discovered is a plasmodium and not a fungus. It lives on decaying organic matter, such as mulch. This type of plasmodium is relatively common and though it looks unsightly, it will not harm your plants. Because it does no harm to plants, I would suggest that you simply turn it into the mulch with a shovel.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - When Pittsburgh Penguins Mario Lemieux, Jaromir Jagr and Jan Hrdina, one of the most feared lines in the NHL, skate on to the ice tonight at MCI Center in their Eastern Conference playoff opener, they will not be extremely happy. The reason for their discomfort will be the three men staring back at them in Washington Capitals uniforms - Steve Konowalchuk, Jeff Halpern and Ulf Dahlen. Konowalchuk, Halpern and Dahlen are not the most famous NHL players, but they are among the most tenacious.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2001
Two people were killed in separate single-vehicle crashes yesterday in Cecil County, including an Earleville woman who turned 19 yesterday. Aubrey Lee Davis, 19, was driving east on Glebe Road a quarter-mile east of Fingerboard Schoolhouse Road in Earleville about 4:35 a.m. when her car drove up the embankment and flipped over five times, ejecting her through the back window, said state police at the North East Barracks. Davis died at the scene. Police said that Davis was not wearing a seat belt and that speed may have contributed to the crash.
NEWS
July 4, 2001
Cecil C. Scruggs Sr., 58, construction worker Cecil C. Scruggs Sr., a former construction worker, died June 27 of heart failure at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime resident of Druid Hill Avenue in Baltimore was 58. Until retiring on a medical disability several years ago, Mr. Scruggs had been employed as a construction worker. He was a fisherman and enjoyed listening to classical music. Mr. Scruggs was born in Buckingham, Va., and graduated from high school there.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2001
Jerome Featherstone dedicated yesterday to his grandmother. "I told her I love her, said I wanted to go out and do this for her," said the Boys' Latin junior. And so he did, winning in the seventh annual Dundalk Invitational for his grandmother who was murdered earlier this month in her East Baltimore home. "She was always on my mind" during the matches, said Featherstone, who took the 152-pound crown when his overtime takedown of Kenwood's county champion, Richard Wemple (9-1), gave him a 3-1 victory in the title bout.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2001
Zipping around suburban Baltimore on something that looks like a motorized skateboard with handlebars, scooter riders aren't about to be confused with the Hell's Angels. But like the motorcycle gang, the riders have generated complaints - enough that Baltimore and Anne Arundel counties have banned them from public roads, sidewalks and parks. Officials in the two counties say there have been no reports of injuries or of marauding scooter gangs. Instead, it was a backlog of calls from residents who find the motorized scooters noisy and dangerous that spurred officials to act. The restrictions put the counties at the center of a national debate on how to deal with a new mode of transport that's considered by some an annoying fad and by others the future of eco-friendly commuting.
SPORTS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 25, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - Call me weird, but I've always been curious about the long snapper. That's not a turtle, it's a title. The long snapper is the unheralded, woefully underappreciated fellow who spreads his legs at the line of scrimmage, tucks his head down - way down and upside down - and hikes the football 15 yards for punts (7 yards for field goals and extra points) just a split-second before some 300-pound defensive tackle comes crushing down on his neck in an attempt to block said punt, field goal or extra point.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2001
The three-fold brochure reads, "OHLA Inc. ... honoring the promise." And in case anyone has forgotten that promise, there is a picture of the Statue of Liberty, her eyes focused, with the words, "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free." It is not only how the Organization of Hispanic/Latin Americans of Anne Arundel County (OHLA) promotes its services, but also how its founders see the mission of the Annapolis-based nonprofit group aimed at helping newly arrived Hispanics gain access to social services and integrate into American life.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
At Ann's Dari-Creme - the wildly popular hot dog and ice cream joint in Glen Burnie - there have been exactly two changes to the menu since Ann and Ray Hines opened their red, white and blue eatery in 1951 on a quiet stretch of Ritchie Highway. French fries were added in 1976, and starting in 1991, customers could get turkey subs - although they rarely do. For five decades, people have been coming to Ann's for foot-longs with everything - mustard, onions and chili - as well as cheese- steaks, burgers, soft ice cream cones and cold, thick milkshakes.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2001
For the moment, sitting inside the giant pinball machine at Arundel Mills, Catherine Jeremenko's three little boys were neither bored nor cranky. Oblivious to their surroundings in the court of a shopping mall, they watched lights flash and huge balls roll through chutes overhead. That was just fine with Jeremenko, a Catonsville mother of six who has found herself at the Hanover mega-mall more and more since it opened a year ago. She still shops at the Mall at Columbia and Marley Station in Glen Burnie.
SPORTS
By Ryan Clark and Ryan Clark,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2001
Two world champions met on the same field yesterday, when world heavyweight titleholder Hasim Rahman stopped by Ravens minicamp to address the team and watch practice. Rahman, who defeated Lennox Lewis for the heavyweight crown in April, met Ravens coach Brian Billick by chance at an Owings Mills shopping mall last week, and after chatting, Billick asked if the fighter would like to speak to the team. "We talked about how both of us are champions, and how both of us plan on holding on and defending our titles," Rahman said.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and By Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 26, 2001
NEW YORK-In the trading pits of the New York Mercantile Exchange, where people shout for a living, fortune often comes with an unfortunate side effect: throat problems. The most common ailments on the commodities floor are screaming-related - throat ulcers, nodules, damaged vocal cords and chronically raspy voices. But curing these afflictions means adopting quieter vocal habits, behavior modification that seems unthinkable in this land where only the loud survive. "Every doctor I've ever been to has told me to change professions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joel B. Obermayer and Joel B. Obermayer,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 26, 2001
On most days, Greg Booze earns his living by driving around in a car full of cell phones that speak gibberish. He has eight of them in a rack in the back of his Ford Explorer. One of the phones beeps, then dials. The call goes through and a man's voice comes on the line: "How do you tell the depth of a well?" "The chicken leg is a rare dish." "He carved a round head from a block of marble. ... " The voice goes on for 2 1/2 minutes. Then it hangs up, beeps and starts over again. Eight phones, all day long.
NEWS
By Maureen Milford and Maureen Milford,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 1, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Unlike the waterfronts in historic East Coast cities that developed their harbors as attractions for residents and tourists, Philadelphia's bleak eastern edge is experienced by most people as a blur as they rocket by on Interstate 95. Because the highway parallels the Delaware River, it has served as a psychological and, to a point, physical barrier to redevelopment of the city's Colonial gateway. Now, with construction of a $75 million apartment building - the first high-rise residential development actually on the river in the city's more than 300-year history - the wall may be beginning to disappear.
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