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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Roch Kubatko, John Harris, Lem Satterfield, Steve Kivinski and Roch Kubatko, John Harris, Lem Satterfield, Steve Kivinski,Staff writers | December 4, 1991
One of the more pressing questions already has been answered: John Brady is returning as Annapolis boys basketball coach.But are his young Panthers equipped to make another run at a state championship? Or will Broadneck, with its senior-dominated lineup, finally get the Panther off its back?And what about Old Mill, a region semifinalist last year that pushed the Bruins to three overtimes before bowing out of the playoffs? Or perhaps Severna Park or Meade, both expected to show marked improvement, will find their way to Cole Field House.
NEWS
By Randi Henderson | April 28, 1991
The beginning of the video snoop can probably be dated to 1948 when a man named Allen Funt hid a camera, tricked people into amusing and sometimes embarrassing situations, then -- after revealing himself and obtaining their consent -- broadcast the results on that fledgling medium, television.Today, Allen Funt -- whose "Candid Camera" show went off the air as a regular series in 1978 -- says this about the ever-increasing intrusion of the video camera into daily life: "It's a subject that I'm so confused about."
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | July 26, 1991
Procter & Gamble Co. said yesterday that it will move the headquarters of its recently acquired Max Factor brand lines to Hunt Valley from Los Angeles by March as part of the consumer products giant's plan to make the Baltimore suburb a strategic site for its U.S. cosmetic and fragrance business.The Max Factor offices will be at 11050 York Road, sharing the same building with Noxell Corp. -- the maker of Cover Girl, Clarion and Navy perfume. P&G purchased Noxell about 18 months ago.James Schwartz, a Noxell spokesman, said that it was too soon to tell how many jobs the Max Factor move will create for Marylanders, but he said that Max Factor's headquarters at Revlon Inc. in Los Angeles employs about 125 people in finance, marketing, research and development, sales and administration.
FEATURES
By LAURA CHARLES | July 10, 1991
THE MARYLAND BALLET celebrated the close of its fifth anniversary season and the opening of its sixth with a fund-raising July Fourth bash aboard the Bay Lady. Dancers from the company were on hand to greet guests, along with special entertainment and dancing to Top 40 hits. A moonlight cruise and a dazzling Inner Harbor fireworks display made for a memorable evening.RADIO ACTIVITY: Local attorney/financial consultant Michael Hodes, whose "Financial Focus" show has aired Saturday mornings on WCBM-AM since 1984 (making it the longest running specialty talk show in the area)
SPORTS
By Chris Foster and Chris Foster,Los Angeles Times | January 6, 1991
Carl Chang is not a bad tennis player. He's just not the best in his family.There's no disgrace in that when your brother is running around the world winning the French Open and playing in the Davis Cup.For Chang, brother of Michael Chang, being second best in tennis has never been a problem. It has allowed him to explore other avenues.Chang has followed academic pursuits at the University of California. He expects to graduate in June with a business degree.His specialty is political economy in an industrial society, which includes healthy doses of business administration, economics and political science.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | May 10, 1991
The Westview Lounge & Supper Club has been such a fixture on the west side of town for 27 years that the waiters make jokes about naming tables for their regulars. Certainly its most famous regular was the late billionaire Harry Weinberg, who kept a lowfile here as elsewhere.Asked whether the elusive billionaire was a good tipper, Westview Lounge manager Loretta Flynn replied, "He was strictly business. He gave the standard 15 percent."Harry Weinberg was wealthier than the rest of the clientele, but he was typical in that he was a conservative older man. The lounge draws customers who are 35 and up, with the emphasis on "up."
NEWS
By Jodi Bizar and Jodi Bizar,Contributing writer | March 17, 1991
Making ducks earned him recognition in folk art circles, but his waywith people has made R. Madison Mitchell a celebrity in his home town of Havre de Grace.Friends of the renowned decoy artist describehim as a man with an uncanny ability to put people at ease and make them forget their problems."To know Mr. Mitchell as a person is much better than to merely appreciate his decoys," said Bill Collins, a decoy artist from Churchville."That's true," said his son, R. Madison Mitchell Jr., 57. "He's special.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
Collecting a paycheck from anyone but a family member is unheard of for the Garvicks.The family meat business is a tradition, an institution, their heritage. It's what they do, how they live and what's important.Four generations of Garvicks have worked in the business that great-grandfather Ira Garvick founded in the 1920s. Garvick's Meat Market & Farms Inc. has grown and changed since, but the family remains the force behind it.Every day, his son, Leroy, Leroy's son and daughter, an in-law and three great-grandsons work together -- for a longtime.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 30, 1991
ABERDEEN -- Rachel Swearingen's eyes softened as she watched her 18-month-old black and tan Doberman, Shoney, roll happily on the living room floor. "It's so good to have her back," she said.The 32-year-old Aberdeen resident never expected to see her dog again after it vanished from her yard on Good Friday, starting an eleven-week ordeal.But the nightmare ended earlier this month when the art of tattooing, telecommunications technology and a child's innocent disclosure led to a dramatic rescue less than a mile from home, possibly saving Shoney from one of the dog-theft rings said to operate in Harford County.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Alisa Samuels and Joe Nawrozki and Alisa Samuels,Evening Sun Staff | April 23, 1991
A major Miami-to-Baltimore cocaine distribution ring was smashed last night by members of a special narcotics task force that arrested eight suspects who police say pumped $20 million worth of the drug into the metropolitan area each month.Two other members of the ring named in warrants were being sought today.The arrests last night capped an undercover investigation that began in November 1989 involving members of the Baltimore police department's Drug Enforcement Section and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration.
SPORTS
By David Young and David Young,Chicago Tribune | August 4, 1991
RIVER FALLS, Wis. -- The Kansas City Chiefs were coming to town for a month, so Lee Jacobs took the opportunity to slash the price of his tortellini a la fini by $3 a plate.He also chucked the escargot and cod amandine, replacing them on the menu with a California veggie sandwich and burgers.The new menu is part of the metamorphosis of The Gladstone, from what Jacobs described as a fine dining restaurant that wasn't quite making it, to a sports bar. The conversion was timed to coincide with a local summer festival in this population-12,000 exurb of the Twin Cities, and especially with the arrival of professional football's Chiefs for their first summer camp in River Falls.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 1, 1991
The New York Yankees gave in to the demands of No. 1 draft choice Brien Taylor and, in the process, heaped a little more financial frustration on baseball's small-market teams.Taylor's $1.55 million contract left the Milwaukee Brewers wondering how they will be able to compete for young talent, especially after their No. I pick, Kenny Henderson (No. 5 overall), turned down a $500,000 offer and enrolled at the University of Miami.It was the second time in four years that the Brewers have failed to sign their top pick.
FEATURES
By Ryan Murphy and Ryan Murphy,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 29, 1991
"I started too late," said Erma Bombeck the other day. "I didn't start writing until I was 37 years old. Terrible! For all the things I've got to do, I should have started when I was 10."She certainly has made up for lost time. In the past 26 years, this housewife turned multimedia sensation has churned out a three-times-a-week column for more than 700 newspapers, written 10 best-selling books and made hundreds of perky TV talk-show appearances. Her latest tome, "When You Look Like Your Passport Photo, It's Time To Go Home" -- an ode to the foibles of traveling -- is a recent No. 1 New York Times best seller, and cements her position as America's favorite humorist.
BUSINESS
By Georgia C. Marudas and Georgia C. Marudas,Evening Sun Staff | February 6, 1991
As companies look for ways to downsize and cut costs, some workers are finding themselves on the receiving end of early-retirement offers.These plans may offer, singly or in combination, a lump-sum payment, additional or enhanced pension benefits, health insurance for a certain period and a "bridge" until Social Security kicks in. Normally, the offer is good only for a limited time, or "window."Financial experts say employees should consider a number of points before making a decision, especially under deadline pressure.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | July 14, 1991
What makes a surgeon?In Dr. Walker Robinson's case, tragedy.One March night more than 30 years ago his future was set in motion by an unlikely event: the death of his brother.It wasn't being mugged and stabbed that killed 27-year-old Edward Robinson Jr. though; it was waiting hours to be seen in a hospital emergency room."It's always bugged me," explains Dr. Robinson, who was 11 at the time. "He had a survivable injury."Today when the pediatric neurosurgeon at the University of Maryland Medical Center successfully races against the clock to stop a child's head from bleeding or to remove a tumor from the brain, he still thinks of Edward and of one family being spared what his wasn't.
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