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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 20, 2000
MEXICO CITY - Through the working-class neighborhood of Pueblo Quieto, a thin, tall man stops to talk with shop owners and housewives in doorways. "Hi. I'm Lopez y Rivas," he says, handing a flier to an old woman in an apron. "I'm running for delegation chief. I hope you'll favor us with your vote." Gilberto Lopez y Rivas is a congressman from the center-left Party of the Democratic Revolution. He is running for chief of Mexico City's most expansive "delegation," or borough, Tlalpan, home to about 700,000 people.
FEATURES
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
Walk though Lynn Supp's garden on a breezy evening in May and you'll find flower-hopping bumblebees, flittering birds and a bevy of buds sprouting through the earth. But much of the lush greenery and splashy perennial color that make for picture-perfect garden parties in late June and early July sleep through the first nascent weeks of the spring season. "It's just starting that magical thing that happens when everything begins to go from dead to it's a jungle," says Supp, a master gardener who spends nearly all her free time in 10 separate gardens on a half-acre in Hampstead.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 7, 2000
ATLANTA - WHEN he heard his name called, Ray Anthony Lewis handed the yellow Wilson No. 4 tennis ball he'd been using for stress relief to Rashid Abdul-Salaam, the tall and smartly dressed private investigator who's been escorting him in and out of the Fulton County courthouse the last three weeks. Lewis adjusted the sleeves of his light-gray, three-button suit and stepped squarely into Courtroom 1B to do what he should have done four months ago. As he took the oath to tell the whole truth, Lewis raised one of the enormous, manicured hands he uses on the football field to tackle opponents.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
UnitedHealthcare became the latest to exit the Medicare HMO market in Maryland yesterday, leaving about 15,500 seniors to look for new coverage by Jan. 1. Nationally, United is leaving 21 counties, where it has 56,000 Medicare HMO members, while remaining in 61 counties, where it has about 350,000 members. Like other major health insurers, United blames the pullouts on federal reimbursements that it contends are too low. The exit of United is a further narrowing of choices for seniors in the state and is part of a national trend by health insurers who are expected to drop 700,000 elderly from Medicare HMOs by the end of the year.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 8, 2000
EMMA MILES celebrated her 97th birthday last week with the help of well-wishers and friends. She's been living with her son, Ray, since April. He's taking care of her with the help of Hospice of Howard County volunteers, members of First Baptist Church of Savage and others who lend a hand. She came to Savage at age 9 from Virginia and has lived in Savage ever since. Her family had come to work at Savage Mill, the town's main employer. Soon, she was was employed there. She worked in the cotton mill from 1917 to 1941.
BUSINESS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Popping champagne corks, whistling noisemakers, rousing choruses of "Auld Lang Syne" - the happy sounds of ringing in the new year can make a home festive and joyful, unless all the sound is coming from someone else's home into yours. And it doesn't necessarily stop when the parties end. Unwanted noises can make life miserable all year long if a home is not built to suppress them. Darryl Ford of Woodlawn found out how taxing noise can be when he owned a Randallstown townhouse. A neighbor's music late Friday night, younger children in the unit next door, sharing a common wall next to someone's staircase, squeaking floors in his own unit: All were "definitely a factor in moving to a single-family home," he said.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Annoyed with the lack of state dollars to pay for prosecuting prison crimes, Anne Arundel County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee is refusing to take on new felony cases from the Department of Corrections complex in Jessup. Two potential cases, a homicide and a felony assault, have been ready for presentation to a grand jury for more than a month. Holding out for what would be the first prison system payment toward prosecution of crimes that occur inside state prisons, Weathersbee has blocked them.
NEWS
By Pamela Woolford and Pamela Woolford,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2000
NINE-YEAR-OLD Leon Little III, like many kids his age, dreams big: "I want to be a basketball player and a doctor," he says. But unlike most 9-year-olds, Leon is turning some of his big dreams into reality. A fourth-grader at Jeffers Hill Elementary School, Leon founded the local nonprofit advocacy group Young Kids Against Violence (YKAV) in October with the support of his mother, Sherl White, and with fellow classmates Jordan McGill and Walter Richardson. On April 24, "The Oprah Winfrey Show" came to Columbia to tape a segment, which aired yesterday, about Leon's work with YKAV.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
Two city employees say they were shunned by colleagues and retaliated against by supervisors after criticizing a landfill repair contract. But as their civil trial opened yesterday, the whistle-blowers' former bosses said the two just didn't like tough management decisions and weren't team players. Jeanne Robinson and David Marc, both Baltimore Department of Public Works engineers, claim in a federal lawsuit that they were punished for exercising their First Amendment free speech rights.
NEWS
By Maria Panaritis and Maria Panaritis,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 12, 2000
PHILADELPHIA -- To thousands of suburbanites and city dwellers who speed past, the Overbrook train station at the Philadelphia-Montgomery County border is just a blur along a storied train line, a tattered wooden building with an obscure history. It is the oldest surviving station on the former Pennsylvania Railroad Main Line between Philadelphia and Pittsburgh -- and it looks it. For years, rotting planks, peeling yellow paint, a rat-infested interior, and Spartan platforms have overshadowed its legacy as the train stop that catalyzed development of Overbrook Farms, one of Victorian America's most deluxe suburbs and one of the first extravagant Main Line communities.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | February 9, 2000
NEW YORK -- Raytheon Co., the No. 3 U.S. defense company, said yesterday that it plans to sell $500 million of businesses this year as it cuts debt and focuses on more-profitable units. The company also told analysts and investors at a conference in New York that it expects revenue to rise an average of 4 percent to 6 percent annually from 2000 to 2004 and earnings to rise 10 percent to 15 percent in the same period. Raytheon said it expects revenue to rise 1.5 percent this year to $20.3 billion and net income to rise to $580 million.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
A redistricting plan to relieve crowding at Odenton Elementary was approved yesterday by the county school board, which also established boundaries for a new West County elementary. The meeting was attended by schools Superintendent Carol S. Parham, who made her first public comment about a racially charged death threat mailed to her two weeks ago. Board members also discussed speeding plans to build a Seven Oaks elementary school, which is expected to receive planning and design money in 2006, according to Thomas Rhoades, who heads county schools redistricting.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 30, 2009
The young men who sell heroin in Baltimore have two ways of getting off the street: prison or homicide. The police arrest them or a rival shoots them, whichever comes first. There's a third way out - choice. Those who live long enough, and who survive prison, sometimes make a choice to go straight and get off the corners for good. By that time, they're usually in their late 20s. Some don't see the light until their 30s. A heroin dealer might even be in his early 40s before making the choice to quit "sellin' poison to my people," as one put it to me. Some never get off the street.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | July 24, 2009
The doors at Slainte, an Irish pub in Fells Point, will open early today, and by midafternoon the place should be packed with soccer fans, many of them headed for M&T Bank Stadium. Bill Irvin, director of operations at the pub and restaurant, knows what's in store - he's witnessed similar scenes for televised broadcasts of top international soccer matches many times before. Baltimore, on the other hand, might be in for something much different from anything it has ever seen as two of the world's elite soccer clubs, Chelsea FC and AC Milan, square off at 8 p.m. before a flag-waving, anthem-chanting sellout crowd of more than 71,000 at a venue typically reserved for American football.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,don.markus@baltsun.com | April 29, 2009
Howard County's police chief said Tuesday that an internal investigation into a brutality accusation in the arrest of a man who led officers on a highway chase last year has been completed and resulted in disciplinary action and retraining. Chief William McMahon said the internal affairs investigation into the Nov. 20 arrest of Jessup resident Stephen Zombro is closed. The chief declined to discuss details of the findings or the disciplinary actions taken, citing department policy on confidentiality of personnel matters.
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