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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | March 4, 2010
Plywood boards scrawled with graffiti cover the doors and windows of more than half the homes in the 2700 block of Tivoly Ave. Drug dealers move along the street, lingering on the porches of vacant houses, residents say. Jagged bottles, mangled plastic chairs and broken toys are heaped in a vacant lot. Two years ago, the city demolished 10 houses on that site with much fanfare. Housing Commissioner Paul T. Graziano declared at the time that Tivoly Avenue would be the centerpiece of a $3.8 million project to "eliminate vast pockets of blight and allow people to live in a decent place" in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood of Northeast Baltimore.
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | March 8, 2010
T he recent firing of an adjunct art instructor by Towson University because the instructor used a racial slur raises many important issues related to race and the power of language, political correctness, and the over-reliance by state universities and state legislators on adjunct employees. Less obvious, but more important, are problems that this incident demonstrates in the discussion of race in our country. First, focusing on the use of a racial slur - in this case, the notorious "N-word" - reinforces the narrow practice of thinking about racial justice only in terms of the treatment of individuals rather than the inequalities in outcomes between racial groups.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 12, 2010
Shareholders of Black & Decker Corp. and The Stanley Works approved the combination of the two companies Friday morning in a deal that will create a multibillion-dollar juggernaut in the power and hand tools business. In one of its last corporate acts as a stand-alone company, Towson-based Black & Decker convened a special shareholders meeting shortly after 9 a.m. and got approval to sell itself to Stanley. Around the same time, Stanley shareholders voted for the deal at the company's headquarters in New Britain, Conn.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | March 12, 2010
Friends and associates of Randy Nixon bought 97 acres of his family's half-century-old West Friendship farm, including the well-known catering facility, for $2.5 million Thursday in an auction at the Howard County Courthouse. The purchase amounts to a rescue of the Nixons' plans to develop most of the property as a multigenerational, green-designed community of about 30 to 40 new homes, said Robert Brantley, 64, a financial adviser to the family. It will also allow Randy Nixon to continue operating the catering and event business on the property.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | liz.bowie@baltsun.com | March 14, 2010
The principal of a Baltimore City high school recruited seven Filipino teachers on her staff to buy and resell thousands of dollars of Mary Kay cosmetics, a business arrangement the teachers entered reluctantly but felt would keep them in good standing with their boss. Principal Janice Williams of the Institute of Business and Entrepreneurship high school in West Baltimore sometimes went to the teachers' classrooms last school year to ask for their credit cards to purchase lipstick, perfume, foundation and eye makeup, according to three of the teachers, who said they never intended to use the products and were unable to resell most of them.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | March 16, 2010
Carol Ann DeGiulio, a zoo development coordinator and former Homeland resident, died Thursday of undetermined causes at Crozer Chester Medical Center in Chester, Pa. She was 55. Mrs. DeGiulio had gone into the hospital for routine kidney stone surgery, family members said. "The cause of death is unknown and the case has been turned over to the Delaware County, Pa., medical examiner," her husband of 21 years, Frank DeGiulio, a lawyer, said Monday. Carol Ann Antlitz was born in Baltimore and raised in Homeland.
NEWS
March 17, 2010
Two education articles, "Principal signs up Filipino teachers to buy, sell makeup" (March 14) and "School system defends responses" (March 16) provide lessons in incredulity and in the denial of justice to teachers. The articles describe how a principal during the last school year asked teachers in her school to become salespersons for May Kay and had them purchase thousands of dollars worth of unwanted cosmetics. The principal, as a sales director for the firm, received bonuses and commissions on the teachers' purchases.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 24, 2010
The neighborhood newcomer and a neighborhood old-timer - Peggy Smallwood and Ernest Smith, respectively - stood at Lakewood Avenue and McElderry Street, in front of a boarded-up rowhouse, next to a trash bag spilling rotted food onto the sidewalk, steps from where pieces of yellow police tape still clung to a sign post. This was within sight of the spot where two Baltimore police officers were shot and wounded Sunday while making a traffic stop, and where the gunman died in the return fire.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
First there was speed dating. Then speed job interviews. And now, speed tourism? That's what's coming to Baltimore. Entertainment Cruises, operator of the Spirit of Baltimore and Inner Harbor Spirit vessels, is planning to offer "high-speed sightseeing cruises" of Baltimore's harbor starting April 3. An open-air speedboat called Seadog III will take up to 120 passengers at a time from the Inner Harbor to the Key Bridge and back, reaching...
NEWS
By Robbie Whelan and Julie Scharper | March 26, 2010
Former Mayor Sheila Dixon has a new job, with a group that has long been a strong supporter of her, and vice versa. Dixon said has been helping the Maryland Minority Contractors Association with marketing and is in the process of hashing out a permanent role with the organization. "All of this is preliminary," said Dixon, who left office Feb. 4 as part of a plea deal to settle criminal charges of embezzlement and perjury. "We're still in discussions." Dixon said she has been working part time to help the association plan a minority business showcase at the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History and Culture next week.
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2010
Entwined in two sheets of purple polyester, Moira Lee dangled gracefully from a 19-foot-high aluminum frame and spun her magic on a crowd gathered at Baltimore's Harborplace on Saturday. The audience cringed as she appeared to fall, only to catch herself inches from the ground. A few yelled "ouch" when she held a midair split for long seconds, and cheered as the petite woman in a mossy green leotard contorted into impossible shapes. "Not many people can do that," said Kelsey Thomson, 16, part of the crowd of onlookers and a volleyball player from Dallas who risked whiplash trying to follow Lee's aerial maneuvers from a concrete seat in the amphitheater by the Inner Harbor.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 2, 2010
The photo tells all. Arms raised in a triumphant "V," body flushed with joy, Orioles pitcher Mike Cuellar leaps off the mound at Memorial Stadium, having stuffed the Cincinnati Reds, 9-3 in the deciding game of the 1970 World Series. "I can still see the look on Mike's face," third baseman Brooks Robinson recalled Friday. "His mouth was wide open and he had a big, big smile." Miguel Angel Cuellar died Friday of stomach cancer at the Orlando (Fla.) Regional Medical Center.
FEATURES
By Meredith Cohn | meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | April 3, 2010
Like much of the other containers and food scraps from the North Baltimore farm-to-table restaurant Woodberry Kitchen, the oyster shells don't go in the trash. The raw bar castoffs - about 2,000 per week - are sent to an Eastern Shore oyster hatchery and then back to the Chesapeake Bay. The restaurant is one of about 20 in the local food industry working with the University of Maryland and a nonprofit group to recycle the calcium carbonate encasements for use by another generation of bivalves.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 4, 2010
S pringtime in Baltimore, and that means lacrosse, high school and collegiate. A friend of mine, Mary Garson, who lives near Boys' Latin School, told me that as soon as the double-whammy February snowstorms had ended, the lacrosse field at the school had been cleared of 50 inches of snow, even while many Baltimore streets still remained impassable. Garson reported that she could hear the screech of whistles and shouting as the team practiced for the season while surrounded by mountains of snow.
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