Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Benjamin Todd Jealous and Margaret Huang | December 7, 2009
The End Racial Profiling Act (ERPA) will soon be reintroduced by Rep. John Conyers, Democrat of Michigan, and Sen. Russ Feingold, Democrat of Wisconsin. Numerous incidents throughout American history have taught us that racial profiling not only fails as a law enforcement tool but ultimately makes us all less safe. Passage of ERPA would be an important step toward ending racial profiling. Over a century ago, Leon Czolgosz walked up to President William McKinley with a concealed weapon and shot him. The Secret Service agent assigned to search the president's visitors was focused on a "dark complexioned man" in line behind Czolgosz.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Theodore S. Sobkov, a retired periodonist who was a film fan and beer lover, died Nov. 26 of complications from dementia at Copper Ridge nursing home in Sykesville. The Tuscany-Canterbury resident was 72. Dr. Sobkov, the son of grocers, was born in Baltimore and raised on East Monument Street and later in Forest Park. After graduating from City College in 1954, he earned a bachelor's degree in European history in 1958 from the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1962, he earned a degree from the University of Maryland School of Dentistry and then served as an Air Force dentist until 1964.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Peter.hermann@baltsun.com | January 29, 2010
An audit has uncovered numerous problems with the Maryland State Police, including failing to adequately review previously approved handgun applications and improperly paying overtime to civilian employees, which investigators said in some cases negated savings realized through furloughs. Auditors found one worker who earned six hours of overtime during a workweek that included eight hours of furlough time. With time-and-a-half, the employee was paid for nine hours of work, which auditors said "eliminated any savings" that the unpaid leave was supposed to have generated.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | January 28, 2010
The arrival of a Baltimore County woman at a White Marsh clinic with a cobra bite to her finger touched off a two-state scramble for antivenin to save her. Meanwhile, her story - that she had come across the highly poisonous monocled cobra in the parking lot of the White Marsh Mall - immediately raised eyebrows among the snake-savvy. Experts say the animals, normally found in Southeast Asia, could not survive outdoors in Maryland in January. And finger bites are typical of injuries to careless snake handlers during feeding.
BUSINESS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
More than 130,000 households in the Baltimore area are eligible for assistance with energy bills but are not currently receiving help, a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. representative told members of a City Hall committee Monday. Customers who are having trouble paying bills can apply for assistance from the Fuel Fund, get help with weatherization and request a visit from a technician to learn how to make their homes more energy-efficient, David Conn, director of BGE's energy assistance program, told members of the urban affairs committee.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
The Mount St. Joseph High School community was in shock Monday after learning that a 2009 graduate of the Irvington campus died Saturday following a 10-mile road march at the Virginia Military Institute. John Alexander Evans, 19, a freshman at the Lexington, Va., college, collapsed in his barracks room after the march, in which more than 400 members of the freshman class participated, and died at a local hospital. The fourth-class cadet was a resident of Highland in Howard County.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 15, 2009
Minutes before convicted Washington-area sniper John Allen Muhammad was executed Tuesday night in Virginia, he said goodbye to a Baltimore lawyer who had become a trusted confidant. "I love you, brother," Muhammad said, according to the attorney, J. Wyndal Gordon, and Gordon told the condemned man he loved him back. Then Gordon shook Muhammad's hand through the bars and clutched his elbow with his free hand. "I was looking at him in his eyes," he said. "There was just no fear there, like he had resigned to it."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper | November 11, 2009
Picking a fresh turkey for Thanksgiving can become as involved as selecting the proper bottle of wine. Just like wine, there are issues of pedigree, terroir, flavor, panache and, of course, price. Every November, I am tempted to rhapsodize about the gourmet moment that occurs when the roasted turkey arrives at the Thanksgiving table. But after standing downwind of a flock of aromatic turkeys, as I did during visits to a couple of local turkey farms, expressions of ecstasy tend to fade.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | November 18, 2009
Sister Maura Eichner, a teacher and poet recalled for her spiritual and lyrical writings, died of congestive heart failure Sunday at the School Sisters of Notre Dame retirement home in Woodbrook. She was 94. Born Catherine Alice Eichner in Brooklyn, N.Y., she grew up in the Yorkville section of Manhattan. Her mother died when Sister Maura was young and she was raised by older family members who left lasting inmpressions. In 1986, she wrote of her childhood, where "I was always a little startled, then beguiled, by the sound of my Irish grandfather's voice.
BUSINESS
By By Jamie Smith Hopkins | The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2009
The mortgage crisis has worsened to the point that about one in every 10 prime borrowers in Maryland and nationwide - homeowners judged to be good credit risks - were behind on payments in September. The Mortgage Bankers Association, releasing those numbers Thursday, blamed unemployment, which is at a 26-year high in Maryland and the United States. Falling home prices are another factor, because owners who owe more than their properties are worth cannot easily sell them. High-interest "subprime" loans, on the other hand, are no longer the big problem.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins and Baltimore Sun reporters | November 3, 2009
Black & Decker Corp., the Towson-based toolmaker founded here almost 100 years ago, said Monday that it plans to merge with The Stanley Works in a $4.5 billion all-stock deal that will bring together internationally known brands but reduce the number of local jobs. For the Baltimore region, it is another in a long line of deals relocating corporate headquarters - and the decision-making power, charitable muscle and prestige they represent. Stanley would have controlling interest in the combined company, which would be named Stanley Black & Decker and headquartered in New Britain, Conn.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2009
I t was not until Tom and Cheryl Atkins steamed off 25 layers of wallpaper in their Butchers Hill home that they discovered, on one of those walls, the exact age of the property they were renovating. "There was a hand-drawn vase and a date [of] 1862," said Cheryl Atkins, who, along with her husband, Tom, own Tomcat Enterprises Inc., a real estate investment firm. The couple bought the house in 1996. Since it had been divided into three apartments, it took two full years to renovate.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | November 30, 2009
Michael and Tressa Schuler of Towson had their wedding all planned: an elaborate but intimate affair at historic Gramercy Mansion with about 75 guests. But then family members extended more invitations, and soon the guest list swelled to 170. "It just started to get too stressful, and we felt that it was a time that we should be happy planning this," Michael Schuler said. With their wedding costs approaching $20,000, the couple opted instead for an "elopement" package at Gramercy that was limited to 20 guests.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik | December 3, 2009
After 21 years at Baltimore's WMAR, Mary Beth Marsden, the face of Channel 2 news, signed off for the last time from the station's anchor desk Wednesday night. She said goodbye to area viewers at the end of the 6 p.m. newscast with the same sense of fun and easygoing grace that distinguished her long career. "Twenty-one years. Fifteen hairstyles. One for every news director," she said in narration over an evocative three-minute package of clips that stretched back to her earliest days at WMAR and closed her last newscast.
NEWS
December 5, 2009
NEW YORK - A rare copy of Edgar Allan Poe's first book has sold for $662,500, smashing the previous record price for American literature. The copy of "Tamerlane and Other Poems" had been estimated to sell Friday for between $500,000 and $700,000 at Christie's auction house in New York City. The previous record is believed to be $250,000 for a copy of the same book sold nearly two decades ago. The 40-page collection of poems was published in 1827. Poe wrote the book shortly after moving to Boston to start his literary career.
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.