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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | September 25, 1997
When Lindsay Breach gets home from a six-hour day at Corkran Middle School in Glen Burnie, her mother says she makes a beeline for the bathroom.She doesn't like to use the bathrooms at school. They don't have outer doors."I don't want anybody looking in there or anything," said Lindsay. The sixth-grader worries eighth-graders would laugh at the sight of her adjusting her clothes or belt outside a stall.Robert Janovsky, in his second year as principal of Corkran Middle, says he likes the doorless bathrooms because they are easier to monitor.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
WASHINGTON -- For the first time since the fall of the Berlin Wall, the United States has put a nuclear weapon with new capabilities into the field, a "bunker buster" designed to destroy underground factories or laboratories while causing relatively little surface damage.The weapon, called the B-61, is a repackaging of a hydrogen bomb that has been deployed in the nation's arsenal for 30 years. That bomb was originally designed to be dropped from an airplane by parachute and exploded while still aloft.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
Cheryl and Dale Poletynski's large new Rosedale home is a monument to communal living -- and a refuge for three frail tenants who otherwise would be hard pressed to find a place offering assisted living on their meager incomes.The couple is among a handful of families taking part in a landmark -- but little-known -- Baltimore County program called Adult Foster Care, the first of its kind in Maryland and now celebrating its 25th anniversary.The $50,000-a-year county program, the model for the state's much larger $5.3 million Project Home, pays families up to $1,000 a month to take low-income and elderly disabled people into their homes.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 12, 1997
The name popped up again -- Salvatore Pasquale Spinnato -- and immediately my mind raced off to that distant West Virginia morning when a man in a maroon bathrobe tried to do to me what he'd done to countless others -- con me.Sal Spinnato was from East Baltimore, a slithery man who'd hooked up with the Federal Bureau of Investigation for an undercover investigation of suspected corruption in the city's Department of Public Works. It was Abscam before Abscam, with FBI agents posing not as Arab sheiks but as blue-jeaned contractors looking for government jobs.
NEWS
March 6, 1997
ONE MUST BE WARY of reading too much into the death of Terrence Johnson.The mysterious circumstances of the crime that defined his life -- the fatal shooting of two Prince George's County policemen in 1978 -- did not become clearer when he put a gun to his head last week, apparently after robbing an Aberdeen bank. Johnson, who was just 15 when he shot the officers in an interrogation room, always claimed he had acted in self-defense after being beaten by members of a force with a penchant for racial hostility.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,Maryland District Court headquarters Pub Date: 1/26/97 SUN STAFF | January 26, 1997
The Howard County state's attorney's office chooses not to prosecute a higher percentage of criminal cases brought in District Court than do its counterparts in other Baltimore suburban counties, according to state statistics.The high rate of untried cases in Howard -- 56 percent compared with a 39 percent average for the other suburban counties -- appears to contrast with the tough-on-crime campaign pledge of Howard County State's Attorney Marna McLendon.She criticized the "poor performance" of her predecessor in Howard, William R. Hymes, on the grounds of dropping too many District Court cases.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 19, 1997
A 16-year-old girl was killed Saturday when the pickup truck she was riding in slammed into a tree near Bel Air, said a spokesman for the Harford County Sheriff's Office.Amy Renee Trent, of the 300 block of Holy Cross Road in Street, suffered severe head injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene of the 7: 15 p.m. accident, said Chief Richard A. Woodward of the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Department, which responded to the accident.The driver of the truck, Steven Riley Crehen, 18, of the 1000 block of Brookwood Drive in Joppa, was released yesterday from Fallston General Hospital, said Sgt. Edward Hopkins, the sheriff's office spokesman.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1997
Three defendants in a federal murder and drug conspiracy trial have been charged with assaulting federal marshals during a courtroom break in which a confrontation occurred after a marshal stopped the prisoners from smoking.Marshals subdued the men with pepper spray and have taken more security precautions -- outfitting some of the defendants in the trial with a belt capable of delivering an electrical shock if they fall out of line.The "stun belt" is used by law enforcement agencies for prisoners deemed highly dangerous.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,SUN STAFF | July 9, 1997
NAACP President Kweisi Mfume said yesterday that the civil rights group would march against police brutality, hold a hearing on military discrimination and reaffirm its support for reparations for slavery at its 88th annual convention.The convention, which begins Saturday in Pittsburgh, is scheduled to include an address by President Clinton and wide-ranging discussions of education policy, including voucher plans, state "takeovers" of urban districts and school busing for desegregation.But Mfume denied recent reports the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was reconsidering its traditional support for integration.
SPORTS
By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 5, 1997
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - When the international crews of the yachts competing in the Whitbread Round the World Race stepped ashore here at the end of Leg 1, they were following in the footsteps of mariners of old.Since its foundation in 1652 as a way station for vessels of the Dutch East India Company, Cape Town has been in the business of welcoming transoceanic sailors seeking rest, refreshment and repair.It has long been known as "The Tavern of the Seas," a reputation enhanced by development of a waterfront complex of hotels, restaurants, bars and shops to rival Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 15, 1997
A 20-year-old Annapolis man was sentenced to life without parole yesterday for stabbing a woman to death and showing off her severed thumb to friends.Mickeen Holland was sentenced by an Anne Arundel Circuit Court judge, who said that she was horrified by the brutality of the slaying and by Holland's use of the victim's thumb as a trophy."You commit this crime, and you remove this woman's thumb, and then you go around the neighborhood and brag about this crime," Judge Pamela L. North told Holland.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF Bloomberg News contributed to this story | September 24, 1997
If Grant Hill is attempting to become the next Michael Jordan, he showed yesterday he is coming closer -- off the basketball court, anyway.The Detroit Pistons star signed a seven-year, $80 million contract with Fila Holdings SpA, one of the most lucrative sports endorsement contracts in history, that will boost his annual take from about $6 million to $11 million.Only Jordan, who recently signed a new contract with Nike Inc., receives more -- roughly $20 million a year. Hill's new deal exceeds the five-year, $50 million contract Allen Iverson of the Philadelphia 76ers signed with Reebok International Ltd.Fila, which has its U.S. headquarters in Sparks, hopes the contract will lead to an increase in sales of its sneakers and a corresponding jump in its stock price, which has gone from a high of $105 a share on Sept.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | September 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Amid the latest twist in the Paula Jones sexual-harassment case against President Clinton -- the pullout of her two top lawyers because of ''fundamental differences'' with her -- one intriguing factor continues to float in the ether, undenied by the White House or the president's lawyers.That is the report that a settlement of $700,000 to Mr. Clinton's accuser was under consideration in talks between her lawyers and his. Robert S. Bennett, Mr. Clinton's top lawyer, has commented only that ''there is no settlement offer on the table,'' which dodges the question of whether there ever was.A spokeswoman for Gilbert Davis, one of the two Jones lawyers who quit her case, says the attorney-client relationship prohibits him from either confirming or denying that the offer was made.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1997
For more than 30 years, Elkridge Community Association has lobbied on behalf of more than 400 homeowners on such issues as a controversial solid-waste trash transfer station and a single ZIP code for the area.That could all change -- not the purpose, but the name.Members are considering changing the group's name because the area the association represents has grown to include parts of Dorsey, Ellicott City, Hanover and Jessup.Members weighed in with their votes for a new name during the group's meeting Thursday night, according to Daniel Vaccaro, an association board member who distributed a survey.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 7, 1997
There's one thing that can be said for "Starship Troopers." In a world where we're all looking for more time, it manages to make two hours seem like four.But those hours are spent suffering through an interminable, muddled mess -- hours the filmgoer might more profitably use re-grouting the bathroom or turning the compost.It's probably safe to assume that director Paul Verhoeven and screenwriter Ed Neumeier, who were responsible for the brilliant science-fiction parody "RoboCop," wanted to cast "Starship Troopers" in a similar vein: a so-bad-it's-good tribute to B-movies of times past, a send-up that winks a sophisticated eye at its own cheesy effects and bad dialogue.
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