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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 19, 2007
Maryland's brand-new governor, its just-retired U.S. senator and a host of other dignitaries gathered at the War Memorial yesterday to see Sheila Dixon sworn in as Baltimore's first female mayor. And when the ceremonies were over, reporters and TV cameras naturally swarmed around none of the above. They flocked instead to the tall guy with huge diamond studs in his ears. Juan Dixon of the Portland Trailblazers is a former University of Maryland star and the new mayor's nephew. He came back to Baltimore to share what he called "a special day."
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | September 9, 2007
I am having trouble cleaning paintbrushes. My high-quality brushes are stiff halfway up from the tips, even though I have been using latex paint and washing them with warm water immediately after each use. How do you clean paintbrushes so they last for years? It is time for some tough love. The expensive brushes are being ruined because you are not cleaning them properly.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | May 12, 2007
The doggedly old-fashioned St. John's College in Annapolis considers its students scholars in the mold of ancients, not modern consumers of an educational pedigree. So it's not surprising that the campus with the "Great Books" curriculum is among a dozen colleges advocating a boycott of a U.S. News & World Report survey that asks schools to rate their peers. The survey factors heavily into the magazine's influential college rankings. "I don't think prestige has anything to do with the education students are getting," said St. John's President Christopher Nelson.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes | November 22, 2007
Maryland correctional authorities are investigating the death Monday night of a Baltimore City Detention Center inmate as a homicide, a prison spokesman said. Correctional officers found Xavier A. Tilghman, 21, lying in grave condition about 7:20 p.m. in his cell. Paramedics took him to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died Tuesday, according to Mark Vernarelli, a spokesman for the state Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services. Vernarelli said that investigators in the public safety department's internal investigative unit are handling the case as an apparent homicide.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | March 24, 2007
Food allergies and asthma have made Suganthan Sundaralingam a sickly kid. But the New Jersey boy, 13, says he's never suffered more than after eating his favorite Taco Bell meal: two chicken tacos. For three sleepless nights in November he was stuck in bed, his intestinal woes causing him to moan, "When is this going to stop?" He has yet to fully recover. Three months earlier, Gwyn Wellborn, 27, of Oregon ate a few spinach salads in the course of a week. She thought she was doing something good for her body.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN REPORTER | June 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- On the threshold of reaching the championship of the nation's most esteemed spelling contest, Maryland's surviving scholars tripped yesterday on an adjective and an art project. Before getting stuck with sejant, an adjective describing an animal in a sitting position, Selena Roper of Annapolis, an eighth-grader at Severn River Middle, had aced oleic and bialy. And Isaak Baker, who is in the eighth grade at Calvert Middle School in Calvert County, had no problem with everything from theologaster to lambdacism to melioidosis.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | May 6, 2007
I know what happens to certain judges of the District Court of Maryland. Boredom starts to build. I have seen the eyes of brilliant men and women glaze on the District Court bench, as they listen to traffic cases or arguments between neighbors or testimony about yet another drug case. If you look hard enough, you can see etched in the glaze the question: "Is this why I went to law school?" Certain judges of the District Court try to enliven things with sardonic levity -- and there was a time, perhaps fully in the past, when this humor was, if not appreciated, certainly accepted.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,sun reporter | February 23, 2007
A veteran Maryland assistant attorney general who lives in Ellicott City will be Howard County's top lawyer, if approved by the County Council. Margaret Ann Nolan, 55, chief of civil litigation for Maryland and a former president of the Font Hill Community Association, is County Executive Ken Ulman's nominee, he announced yesterday at a news conference. Nolan would replace Barbara Cook, county solicitor for two decades, who is retiring March 1. Nolan's name will be submitted to the County Council on March 5. A public hearing is scheduled March 19, with a vote to follow April 4. Deputy County Solicitor Paul Johnson will be acting solicitor in the interim.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun reporter | June 7, 2007
"This really is the perfect ride for this thing," says Stuart Blum as he and six friends pedal his bike along the Light Street side of the Inner Harbor. Yes, that math is correct: Seven cyclists are pumping away on one, single, not-so-solitary "Conference Bike." Sometimes whimsy can be the mother of invention. A Dutch sculptor/wannabe mechanical engineer created the Conference Bike. There are about 150 in circulation worldwide. Blum, a 47-year-old lawyer who collects exotic bikes, teamed with a friend to buy a used one on eBay last year for $9,000.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | September 17, 2007
Anthony B. Sala, who spent 33 years running a galvanizing business before opening a cafe in Little Italy in his 80s, died of complications from a stroke Wednesday at Stella Maris Hospice Care in Timonium. He was 87. Mr. Sala, born in East Baltimore to Sicilian immigrant parents, was one of six children. His father died when he was 6. He was an athletic boy who spent most of his time outside playing street ball with his older brothers and friends. He attended Polytechnic Institute for three years, leaving school in 1937 to become an airplane mechanic and sheet metal worker at Glenn L. Martin Co. Five years later, he met and married Elisa M. DeAngelis.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,Sun reporter | April 15, 2007
Growing up as the son of a Baltimore police officer, Joseph M. Giordano devoured Mickey Spillane's detective tales and Ian Fleming's spy stories. When he grew up, he decided, he wanted to be a private eye. But then he got into Gregory McDonald's Fletch novels, about an irrepressible newspaper reporter, and Giordano found a new calling: journalism. Giordano's travels and career have taken him to the weekly Prague Post in the Czech Republic and back home as a photographer and writer for The Dundalk Eagle, where he currently works.
NEWS
By Marina Sarris and Marina Sarris,Special to The Sun | March 18, 2007
From Orphans' Court judge to governor, U.S. senator to city commissioner, no public service job was too big or too small for John Eager Howard, the Revolutionary War colonel for whom Howard County was named. Born to a wealthy Baltimore County family in 1752, he made his name in the American Revolution, gaining recognition for military prowess and courage. "He belonged to a generation of Marylanders who served the Revolution well," said Maryland State Archivist Edward C. Papenfuse. In the 1781 Battle of Cowpens, Howard, then a lieutenant colonel, was "credited with turning the apparent British triumph into an American victory" in South Carolina, according to "John Eager Howard: Patriot and Public Servant," a Maryland Historical Magazine article by Cary Howard.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | August 9, 2007
Gail Goldsmith was so afraid that she violated her Jewish beliefs and picked up the telephone on the Sabbath to call 911. Her husband had just used their 2-year-old daughter as a weapon to beat her, according to an account she gave police, and the child was bleeding from a wound on her right forearm. At an emergency hearing in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday, Jason Goldsmith, 38, was ordered held without bail. He is charged with first-degree assault and second-degree child abuse in the June 30 incident at the family's home in Northwest Baltimore.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,SUN REPORTER | February 6, 2007
Maryland lawmakers are developing a bill that would allow state residents to block access to their credit reports, a tool that consumer advocates say is needed to protect against identity theft in an age of instant credit. Passage of the bill is far from assured, however, as lobbyists in Annapolis are at loggerheads. Banking, credit bureau and insurance lobbyists want provisions that could weaken support among privacy activists and consumer groups, such as limits on who can put a "security freeze" in place and for how long.
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