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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
A researcher who directed a study by the Kennedy Krieger Institute into methods of reducing lead in inner-city homes disputed yesterday assertions by the state's highest court that his methods were ethically flawed. Dr. Mark Farfel, who has studied the city's lead paint problem for two decades, said his study was in no way comparable to the notorious Tuskegee study of untreated syphilis in which government doctors withheld treatment from ailing men so they could study the disease's progression.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 11, 2001
Long Island University used a 13-2 run to pull away from Mount St. Mary's, 81-71, in Northeast Conference men's college basketball action at the Schwartz Athletic Center in Brooklyn, N.Y. Guard Maurice Yearwood scored a career-high 25 points to lift the Blackbirds (9-13, 9-6) to their sixth win in seven games. The first media timeout of the second half came with 12:42 left and the Blackbirds leading, 44-43. After the timeout, Long Island got seven points from Antawn Dobie and baskets from Ray Rivera and JaJa Bey in taking its first double-digit lead of the game.
NEWS
By Michael Scarcella and Michael Scarcella,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
The cupola atop the Towson courthouse was the target of criticism from the moment it was completed in 1856. Judged too tall, the 70-foot octagonal structure was reduced by more than half only seven years later. Now repairs are again being made -- but nothing as drastic as that first refitting. Manolis Painting Co. of Timonium is stripping away layers of lead paint and replacing broken windows on the structure, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a Baltimore County landmark.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2001
LAS VEGAS -- Yesterday's news conference for Saturday's heavyweight rematch ended with Lennox Lewis and his entourage walking out, refusing to pose for the traditional photos between the fighters. Shouting at him as he left was Baltimore's Hasim Rahman, the man from whom Lewis hopes to regain the World Boxing Council and International Boxing Federation crowns he lost via a fifth-round knockout in April. "Come on back, Lennox! I'm not going to hit you in the mouth until Saturday!" Rahman yelled as Lewis departed.
NEWS
By David W. Dunlap and David W. Dunlap,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 2001
NEW YORK -- No one, not even 120 years later, is prepared to say that the citizenry got everything it paid for at the New York County Courthouse behind City Hall. But an $85 million restoration of that notorious landmark, better known as the Tweed Courthouse, has uncovered a surpassingly vibrant 19th-century civic structure. Disdained and underused for so long, it was preserved by default. Now that it is coming back to light, one can marvel at just how much of a building New York received in exchange for lining the pockets of the political boss William M. Tweed and his Tweed Ring confederates.
NEWS
By Sandy Bauers and Sandy Bauers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 21, 2001
WESTTOWN, Pa. - The first year, teacher Shannon Almquist thought she had just lucked out with a spectacular class. But when success repeated itself the second year, then the third, she quit worrying. Fourth-graders really did enjoy needlework, boys included. Recently, when Almquist stood before her 19 girls and boys, she smiled. "You are going to make an heirloom," she announced. "One day, when you're very old, someone will go through the attic and find it and say, `What's this?'" For the second time in more than 200 years, stitching samplers is becoming a tradition at the Westtown School.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 21, 2001
Don Garth of Timonium is seeking a recipe for a ham loaf with pineapple. His answer came from Betty Zofer of St. Augustine, Fla., who noted, "I have never made this ham loaf, but hope it will help. It is from the Joy of Cooking." Ham Loaf Serves 6 1/2 cup crushed pineapple 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1 pound smoked ham 1/2 onion, minced 1/8 teaspoon pepper 3 tablespoons mixed fresh herbs 2 eggs, well-beaten 1/2 to 1 cup cracker or plain bread crumbs, an equal amount of milk 1/2 pound lean pork, ground Grease a medium loaf pan. In a small bowl mix together pineapple and mustard.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN COLUMNIST | May 13, 2001
CLEVELAND - All that Ravens fans want from their new quarterback, Elvis Grbac, is a jazzed-up passing attack and a bit more excitement on offense. Oh, and another Super Bowl championship. Anything short of an NFL title might be considered a failure, with Grbac taking the blame. Hearing that, Grbac laughs while sitting on the sofa in the family room of his Victorian-style house in Chagrin Falls, an area of lakes and waterfalls in a southeastern suburb outside Cleveland. "I haven't spent a lot of time in Baltimore, but it's a place that is pretty hungry," he said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
Rose Posner's children, locked in a bitter battle over her $20 million estate, have spent the past three weeks in a Baltimore County courtroom smearing each other's names. Now, a Baltimore County Circuit Court jury will decide who gets how much. Posner, the widow of a wealthy developer, wrote a 12th and final will before she died in 1996 that left the bulk of the $20 million to her son and gave her daughters $100 each. But the daughters, Judith A. Geduldig and Dr. Carol Jean Posner Gordon, sued, alleging that their brother, Dr. David B. Posner, fraudulently turned their mother against them and lied to cheat them out of their rightful inheritance.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2001
A Baltimore County Circuit Court jury awarded a Lutherville couple $2 million yesterday, finding their son's mental disabilities were caused by the doctor who delivered him in 1995. Brian and Janine Sterner were awarded $1.5 million for future medical expenses, $450,000 for lost wages and $50,000 for pain, suffering and medical bills by a jury that heard more than a week of testimony and deliberated two days. The Sterners accused Dr. Monica Ann Buescher of negligence in a suit filed in 1999, four years after their son, Frank, was born with respiratory problems and other ailments that required 11 days of treatment at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Norah Vincent and By Norah Vincent,Special to the Sun | December 16, 2001
Tobacco: A Cultural History of How An Exotic Plant Seduced Civilization, by Iain Gately. Grove Press, 400 pages. $25. Even nonsmokers will appreciate novelist Iain Gately's lively and engaging account of how the world -- most of which never knew about, much less consumed, tobacco until the mid 16th century -- came, so to speak, to need the weed. It is an astounding story. When you consider that originally, the plant was indigenous to South America alone, and only made its way across the globe relatively late in the history of human civilization, first as booty, then as bounty from the New World, it seems all the more amazing that it now so thoroughly suffuses almost every culture and nation on the planet.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2001
A 16-year-old Finksburg boy remained in jail yesterday after he was accused of threatening a teen-age girl by holding a shotgun to her head. Jason Dale Wickens of the 2800 block of Lawndale Road was charged as an adult with first- and second-degree assault and with attempting to intimidate a minor, court documents show. His bail was raised from $10,000 to $100,000 Wednesday at a bail review hearing in Carroll County District Court. According to court documents, a girl was threatened with a 20-gauge shotgun to stop her from exposing a lie concocted by Wickens and a friend.
NEWS
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,Special to the Sun | December 23, 2001
It wasn't until I saw the English moors carpeted with gorgeous swaths of pink and purple heath and heather in bloom that I got it. Heathcliff -- the protagonist of Emily Bronte's 19th-century Gothic novel, Wuthering Heights. Heath. Cliff. His name echoes the wild beauty of the moors, which are covered with tough, shrubby heath plants that bloom even in the drab dead of winter. (Of course, the "cliff" part bodes ill for the poor guy, but never mind.) Heaths are survivors. There are more than 700 heath species, many of which grow wild all over Europe and in Africa.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2001
Seven Baltimore towing companies were granted license renewals yesterday at the towing board's annual review meeting, but four of them must comply with certain "conditions" within 30 days or face suspension. The conditions include creating a customer refund policy, installing an on-site automated teller machine and ensuring that the machine dispenses enough money in one transaction to cover the cost of a tow, which is generally $210. Some of those conditions, such as the ATM, are based on a City Council ordinance that took effect in September governing private towing companies.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Rick Belz and Kevin Van Valkenburg and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2001
Nothing helps mold a cohesive girls soccer team like skipping practice to go rock climbing. Just ask Wilde Lake. The Wildecats, 9-4 overall and 6-2 in Howard County, have looked both brilliant and erratic this season, evidenced by their 2-1 upset of then-No. 2 River Hill on Oct. 2, which they followed with a 3-2 loss to unranked Atholton. But during the final two weeks of the county season, arguably no team has been better, as Wilde Lake has earned four straight wins, knocking off Long Reach, Oakland Mills, Centennial and Glenelg by a combined score of 18-4.
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