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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
A city detective choked up on the witness stand Friday as she described the moment she spotted a young pit bull — like her own pet, Blu — engulfed in flames on a West Baltimore street. Detective Syreeta Teel testified that she leapt from her squad car and smothered the blaze with a sweater, while the female pup, later named "Phoenix" by rescue workers, wailed. That account set the tone for the first day of testimony in the trial against teenage brothers Travers and Tremayne Johnson, who are accused of dousing the dog in accelerant and setting her on fire on May 27, 2009.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2011
It's a widely held assumption, true or not, that cops give other cops breaks on traffic infractions. A quick flash of the badge, a union sticker on the bumper, a patch on the dashboard are the same as a wink and a nod, and a look the other way. But the growing number of cameras set up to catch speeders and red-light runners in Baltimore and elsewhere has become the great equalizer for traffic scofflaws — unbiased enforcers of bad driving habits....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
Hollywood never provided a richer picture of the Jim Crow South than Clarence Brown's "Intruder in the Dust," a fresh, inspired adaptation of William Faulkner's 1948 novel. It's not a message movie about racial injustice. It's about the American experience of growing up by crashing through the precepts and prejudices of your town, your state, your region — and your family. It combines a coming-of-age fable and a detective story with an acute dissection of tribal beliefs and herd mentality.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2011
Founded in 1998 by James Beard Award-wining chef Roy Yamaguchi, Roy's has expanded far beyond its original Hawaiian home. There are now more than 30 worldwide. So yes, Roy's is a chain, but the closest one to the restaurant in Harbor East is 700 miles away, in Chicago, so it's not as though they're falling out of trees around here. I know a few locals who are devoted to it, but it's an obvious asset for the convention and tourism business — Roy's was crowded on a recent weeknight and, taking a wild guess, I'd say that about two-thirds of the diners were out-of-towners.
NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2011
Baltimore County police said they have a suspect in the Monday morning appearance of a toilet with a cellular phone and notes attached to it outside the Baltimore County Courthouse, which caused street closures and sparked concerns of a bomb scare in Towson. About 8 a.m., security personnel at the courthouse found the strange object, which included a porcelain toilet, an electronic transmitter, a telephone and "numerous miscellaneous notes," said police Lt. Robert McCullough. Police closed the 400 block of Washington Ave., near the intersection with Pennsylvania Avenue and a government building that houses the offices of the county executive and County Council, during the hazardous devices team's investigation, but the object was found to be harmless.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Nelson Leighton "Pete" Bond Jr., a former Alex. Brown & Sons investment executive and business owner, died Monday of complications from diabetes at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 75. Mr. Bond, whose father was executive vice president of McGraw Hill Publishing Co. and president of McGraw Hill International and whose mother was a homemaker, was born in Montclair, N.J., and raised in Essex Fells, N.J. After graduating from Montclair High School in 1953, he earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1957 from Lehigh University.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2011
Last Saturday, I went to Dubai. No, not the glitzy metropolis in the United Arab Emirates; the club on 200 E. Redwood St. that opened in late January under a new name after two years as the troubled Velvet Rope. With the change, the owners hope to distance themselves from a tarnished old name and associate themselves with the luxury that Dubai brings to mind. But those aspirations might be too lofty. If rebranding was all that a bad reputation needed, Hosni Mubarak might still be in power.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | February 18, 2011
Ken Griffey, Jr. retired from baseball last summer, but apparently he is still marketable. The former Seattle Mariners superstar recently filmed a Nike Swingman commercial in which Orioles centerfielder Adam Jones made a brief cameo. And Jones was wearing a superhero outfit. Jones doesn't have any lines, but I thought you might like to see him in a backwards cap, a cape, fake pectoral muscles and a utility belt. Enjoy.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2011
Former state health secretary Martin Wasserman and his physician wife Barbara have made careers caring for people, but they've also long shared a passion for animals. They share their Ellicott City home with two dogs, three cats and three horses. She's a vegetarian. Since graduating from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1968, they've been troubled for having trained on dogs. U.S. medical schools have since eschewed canines, a few like Hopkins still use pigs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
The idea of a single-payer health care system was lost in the debate over the much-amended national health care reform passed by Congress last year, but three Howard County delegates are co-sponsors of legislation in this year's General Assembly that seeks to bring the idea to fruition in the Free State. The concept involves having everyone in the state get health care through one insurance pool to which everyone pays premiums. It eliminates the variety of insurance companies that now offer coverage only to those insured through an employer or who can pay. The Senate version (SB 388)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2012
"Aren't you always so clever with your schemes and your plots?" Queen Cersei Lannister "Schemes and plots are the same thing. " -- Tyrion Lannister It wouldn't be a stretch to argue that the second season of"Game of Thrones"has been a good deal duller than Season 1. Until tonight. During the HBO show's first season, no less than four major characters (including several potential kings) were killed off: Protagonist Ned Stark, Khal Drogo, Viserys Targaryen and the king himself, Robert Baratheon.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Two city youths charged with fatally shooting a 13-year-old girl in the chest and then hiding her body under a pile of trash in an East Baltimore alley admitted to their respective roles in the killing Tuesday afternoon in juvenile court. A 13-year-old boy tendered an admission — the juvenile court equivalent of a guilty plea — to a charge of involuntary manslaughter for accidentally shooting Monae Turnage in March. A 12-year-old friend admitted to being an accessory to the crime for helping move her body.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
— Just after dawn Tuesday, law enforcement officers began yanking hundreds of trucks off the Capital Beltway and funneling them to an inspection lot a long touchdown pass from FedEx Field. The truck-safety dragnet pulled over 420 rigs and resulted in 12 drivers and 87 vehicles being taken off the road. Offenses ranged from falsified log books and drivers spending too many hours behind the wheel to bad tires and defective brakes. "Within an hour, drivers from Maine to Florida will know we're out here," said State Police Capt.
NEWS
By David Simon, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
His great sin is that he never looked the part: The ruddy complexion and the insubordinate hair and that godawful mustache that should never have belonged to anyone with more solemnity and poise than an East Baltimore Street pimp, drunk and luckless, down to his last working girl. The wardrobe was disastrous. He made the rest of the slumming metro veterans look almost plausible. His laugh was a cackle, employed liberally against the farts and foibles of the important and famous.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2012
Political consultant Julius Henson may have written the automated message that encouraged Democrats to stay home from the polls on Election Day 2010, but he didn't force voters to believe it, jury foreman Renee Johnson said Friday, explaining the split verdict in his case. "We, as a people, because we live in a democratic society, we have the choice of believing or not to believe. You choose to believe it, it's on you," said Johnson of East Baltimore, adding that tactics intended to influence voters are nothing new for political operatives such as Henson.
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