More is not better

faceoff: are there too many college football bowl games?

December 30, 2008|By CANDUS THOMSON

How did this country get in the financial pickle it's in, Childs? By confusing quantity with quality. Two flat-screen TVs must be better than one flat-screen. And four of those babies? Hog heaven - who cares if we have nothing in the rainy day fund?

Same goes for bowl games. Thirty-four bowl games? That's 68 teams, or better than half of all Football Bowl Subdivision programs. You can't tell me with a straight face that there are 68 quality football teams in this country, not after watching a single quarter of the Independence Bowl's clash of the titans, Northern Illinois vs. Louisiana Tech.

Roady's Humanitarian Bowl? It would be a humanitarian gesture to the game of football (to say nothing of a symbolic gesture to thousands of furloughed Maryland state workers) if Maryland and Nevada, two 7-5 teams, stayed home.

Don't tell me this is for the fans and players, Childs. If Maryland fans want to see the Terps one more time, have everyone get together at Byrd Stadium for a tailgating party.

Finally, look at some of the sponsors: Citi ($45 billion in taxpayer bailouts this year), GMAC ($38 billion in debt), FedEx (5 percent salary cuts and elimination of the 401(k) match for workers). Glad they have their priorities in order.

Since 1902, when Michigan beat Stanford in the first Rose Bowl, bowls have been stacked like an Ikea gone wild. At the end of the 1966-67 season, there were eight bowl games. In 1996-97, there were 18 bowl games. Seven years later, there were 28 bowl games. Some say next year the NCAA might add two more for a total of 36.

Hey, I've got a great idea. Let's invite every team to a bowl game.

Too many bowl games? As Sarah Palin would say, "You betcha."

Baltimore Sun Articles
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.