George Sherwood, lawyer, World War II veteran

December 25, 2008|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

George M. Sherwood, a semi-retired lawyer and a decorated World War II combat infantryman, died of lung cancer Dec. 18 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 86.

Mr. Sherwood was born and raised in Pittsburgh. In 1943, he earned a bachelor's degree in political science from the University of Pittsburgh, where he also had been editor of The Pitt News, the university's newspaper.

He was commissioned a lieutenant in the Army in 1944, and was assigned to an anti-aircraft battery before transferring to the 35th Infantry in France.

Mr. Sherwood, who fought at the Battle of the Bulge, received the Bronze Star for heroism, and the Purple Heart. He also was decorated with the Combat Infantryman's Badge and three battle stars.

After the war, Mr. Sherwood, who was discharged in 1946 with the rank of captain, remained in the Army Reserves, attaining the rank of colonel.

He earned his law degree from the University of Maryland Law School in 1949, and began practicing law with Weinberg & Green.

Mr. Sherwood, who was an accountant and practiced tax law, later was associated with Burke, Green & Willen, before becoming a solo practitioner.

He still retained several clients at his death, according to his wife of 60 years, the former Sylvia Pangalis.

"He was a simple, elegant man whose always erect posture but relaxed conversational style bespoke a military bearing without ostentation. A good man," said Lou Panos, a retired Towson Times newspaper columnist, and longtime friend.

"Until his final illness, he enjoyed dancing, golfing, bowling and joining friends in pool games held on his basement table," Mr. Panos said.

Mr. Sherwood was a member of the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation, where services were held Saturday.

Also surviving are a brother, Nicholas Chirigos of Tampa; a niece; and three nephews.

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