Suggs: 'Nothing to stir up'

RAVENS NOTEBOOK

He hasn't received further warning about 'bounty' on Steelers' Ward but thinks Goodell will be 'watching'

December 11, 2008|By Jamison Hensley | Jamison Hensley,jamison.hensley@baltsun.com

As the Ravens began preparation for their heated rematch with the Pittsburgh Steelers, defensive end-linebacker Terrell Suggs said he hasn't received another warning from the NFL office this week about bounties.

"But I have a good feeling Roger will be somewhere nearby watching," said Suggs, referring to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell.

Two months ago, Suggs told an Atlanta radio station the Ravens had a "bounty" on Steelers wide receiver Hines Ward. In the same radio interview, he called Ward "a cheap-shot artist" before saying the Ravens "got something in store for him."

The NFL then sent Suggs a letter informing him that any further comments or on-field activity indicating his participation in bounty activity could result in "significant disciplinary action."

Suggs, who leads the Ravens with 6 1/2 sacks, declined to talk about Ward.

"There's nothing to stir up," Suggs said. "We're playing them this week, so I'm not going to downgrade him or compliment him at this point."

Playoff math

The Ravens need some help, but they could clinch a playoff spot Sunday.

Here are the scenarios to secure a postseason berth:

* The Ravens win, the New England Patriots lose and either the New York Jets or Miami Dolphins lose.

* The Ravens win and the Jets, Dolphins and Indianapolis Colts lose.

All four of those teams - the Patriots, Dolphins, Jets and Colts - are favored to win Sunday.

New running back

The Ravens signed running back Jalen Parmele off the Dolphins' practice squad, bolstering the depth of a banged-up group.

Ray Rice (bruised leg) and Willis McGahee did not practice yesterday. Rice has a bruised lower leg, and McGahee was excused for personal reasons.

Parmele, a sixth-round pick out of Toledo, was inactive for the Dolphins' first three games of the season before being waived. He was then added to their practice squad.

"We felt like he was the best player out there on practice squads that we could bring in," coach John Harbaugh said. "We've been kind of studying him all year. There is a chance that he can help us here the last three weeks with our injury situation at running back."

The Ravens' biggest concern seems to be Rice, who leads the Ravens in yards per carry this season (4.2). The rookie second-round pick had a walking boot sitting outside his locker.

Death saddens Reed

Ed Reed was named AFC Defensive Player of the Week for the second time in four weeks, but the free safety wasn't in the mood to celebrate.

Reed was saddened by the news that Ronald Jackson, 14, was shot dead Monday while delivering fruit to a neighbor in West Baltimore. Jackson was an eighth grader at Booker T. Washington Middle School, a school that Reed has sponsored for six years.

"My prayers go out to the Jackson family," said Reed, who is not sure whether he ever met Jackson.

End zone

In addition to Rice and McGahee, six others did not practice: wide receivers Derrick Mason (shoulder), Mark Clayton (knee) and Yamon Figurs (knee); safeties Reed (hamstring) and Jim Leonhard (illness); and kicker Matt Stover (ankle). Offensive tackle Jared Gaither (shoulder) and guard David Hale (ankle) were limited in practice. ... To make room for Parmele, the Ravens placed defensive tackle Lamar Divens (shoulder) on injured reserve. He is the 18th player to be put on injured reserve, which is the most the Ravens have ever had in their 13-year history (the previous high was 14 in 2005). ... Mason said he agreed "in a sense" with Dolphins linebacker Joey Porter, who defended Giants wide receiver Plaxico Burress in saying pro athletes have a right to own guns. "I should have the right to bear arms," Mason said. "If I choose to have a firearm in my house, I'm going to have one. But to bring one outside the home, that's not smart."

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