Swiftpicks: 10 things not to miss from A&E editor Tim Swift

November 23, 2008|By Tim Swift

TV

'Dancing with the Stars':

You may be ashamed to admit it, but judging from the ratings, someone's watching this hokey hoedown. Look for a three-way race among former boy-band singer Lance Bass (above), retired NFL star Warren Sapp and E! channel eye-candy Brooke Burke. The final performances air at 8 p.m. tomorrow, and the winner is crowned at 9 p.m. Tuesday on WMAR, Channel 2.

BOOKS

'Panic: The Story :

: of Modern Financial Insanity: ':

In his latest book, Michael Lewis explores the roots and ruin of five recent financial debacles - including our current one. While Lewis gives the requisite history lesson, he also gives us a glimpse of what the talking heads were saying in the heat of the crisis. These tidbits are especially intriguing in light of our current deluge of "advice." In stores Tuesday.

CONCERT

Tina Turner:

After making a splash at this year's Grammy Awards (three words: awesome hot pants), Turner, a rock and soul legend, hopped back on the tour bus after a seven-year hiatus. The break hasn't cooled demand to see the diva. Her tour is one of the year's best-selling. She performs at 7 tonight and 7:30 p.m. tomorrow at Washington's Verizon Center.

For more: verizoncenter.com

POP MUSIC

'808s & Heartbreak':

by Kanye West:

The oh-so-humble Chicago rapper may have overreached a wee bit when he recently called himself "the voice of this generation." But that doesn't mean West has nothing to say. Thoughtful and poppy (he sings more than raps), West's new album is a departure from his hip-hop wheelhouse, and the gamble mostly pays off. In stores tomorrow.

ART

'Art-I-Ficial':

by Jim Lucio:

Photography has been thought to capture reality so well that it has been accused of stealing souls. Yet there is a potent phony flipside to the art form that Lucio gleefully celebrates in his show at the Metro Gallery. On display 5 p.m.-2 a.m. Thursday-Sunday through Dec. 13.

For more: myspace. com/metrogallery

DVD

Jason Bateman:

in 'Hancock':

The powerful always need good image-makers, so why would superheroes be immune? Channeling his Arrested Development days, Jason Bateman is the perfect PR sidekick for Will Smith's surly superman. Yeah, the movie eventually devolves into a gooey mess, but Bateman and the snarky first half are worth a second look. In stores Tuesday.

THEATER

'Peter Pan':

Stage productions of Peter Pan may have you humming Aerosmith's "Dude Looks Like a Lady." But Olney Theatre Center throws the traditional casting rules out the oversized Victorian window: Peter's a guy, and Wendy and the other kiddies are played by adults. Rest easy, the crocodile is still a fake. Playing through Jan. 4 at Olney Theatre Center.

For more: olneytheatre.org

POP MUSIC

'Day & Age':

by The Killers:

Showing no signs of diminished ambition, the Las Vegas rockers' latest album has all of the subtlety of a Siegfried & Roy spectacular. It's chock-full of epic choruses, soaring vocals and high drama. The glitz blitz is mostly successful, delivering highly satisfying synth-pop despite the occasional detours into the bizarre. In stores tomorrow.

TV

'Heroes':

The once-mighty action series Heroes ain't doing so super this year. Viewers have fled in droves, and NBC is pulling out all the stops this week to turn things around. The network's solution? Take away the heroes' cool superpowers. It's a bold and extremely counterintuitive move, but, hey, desperate times call for desperate measures. Airs 9 p.m. tomorrow on WBAL, Channel 11.

DANCE

'Above and Beyond':

by Air Dance Bernasconi:

Towson University professor Jayne Bernasconi and her troupe are back with more gravity-defying dance moves. While many performers remain high up, hanging on a trapeze or clutching fabric, others stay more grounded. But they're just as agile as they walk - on their hands. Opens 8 p.m. Friday at Theatre Project.

For more: theatreproject.org

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