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LETTERS

October 24, 2008

More creative ways to curb trash costs

Mayor Sheila Dixon suggested that one way the city could reduce costs to grapple with the budget shortfalls was to reduce trash collection to one day a week and cut back the number of recycling days ("City cuts fire, police OT and extends hiring freeze," Oct. 21). That is one trial balloon that should be deflated immediately.

Despite the slogans about a cleaner and greener Baltimore, the city is still very much awash in garbage scattered in our alleys, streets and parks.

I suggest that the mayor think creatively when it comes to reducing trash costs.

The mayor has said that city employees should step up and find ways to do more so they do not lose their jobs.

I would suggest that the mayor keep this in mind as she looks for ways to cut costs, because if her actions result in the city becoming a place that's not worth living in, she will be the one to lose her job come the next election.

John Tully, Baltimore

Who would want a 400-unit neighbor?

After reading Laura Vozzella's column regarding the proposed development of the Baltimore Country Club property in Roland Park ("Developers start to dig the way of the NIMBY," Oct. 19), we have one question for her: Would she like a 300- to 400-unit care community placed in her backyard?

Constance Fitzpatrick Mary Jo Johnson, Baltimore

Symphony provides artistic magnificence

Marin Alsop and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra have done it again ("Despite flaws, BSO's 'Mass' is compelling," Oct. 17). They have provided our region the opportunity to experience an artistic magnificence seldom achieved even in the world's greatest music centers.

I realize that I attended a different performance of Leonard Bernstein's Mass than music critic Tim Smith did. But rather than seeing this performance as "flawed," I found this massive production, relying on so many disparate parts, to be seamlessly put together in a way that was nothing short of ingenious.

How privileged we are to have this level of performance quality in our midst.

Sylvia Eastman, Baltimore

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