Suspect in kidnapping has record

Man wanted in Timonium assault on couple was charged in armed carjacking last year

October 17, 2008|By Nick Madigan | Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com

An 18-year-old man being sought in the carjacking and kidnapping a week ago of two teenagers in Timonium has, in the past year, been accused of committing crimes on three other occasions - one of them an armed carjacking that resulted in 16 charges against him, court records show.

Baltimore County police issued a warrant for the arrest of Brian Tyrone Scott, of the 800 block of Pontiac Ave. in Baltimore's Brooklyn neighborhood. He is believed to be one of two men who approached an occupied car parked last Friday at a light rail station on Deereco Road and commandeered it at gunpoint, its two young occupants - a man and a woman - still inside, according to police.

At some point during their ordeal, the woman was sexually assaulted, and both were later released in the Cherry Hill neighborhood of Baltimore, police said. Investigators have not yet identified the man who they say accompanied Scott.

Scott was not prosecuted on any of 16 charges resulting from the Oct. 27, 2007, armed carjacking of a Honda Accord outside Harbor Hospital in Baltimore. Court records say that he and another man approached a doctor from Miami and, identifying themselves as police officers, demanded her keys. Scott, the documents say, displayed a handgun in his waistband before both men fled in the woman's car.

The doctor, after leaving town, did not respond to calls or letters from authorities in Baltimore, leaving prosecutors without a case to pursue, Margaret Burns, a spokeswoman for the State's Attorney's Office, said yesterday.

Scott did, however, plead guilty to attempted robbery of a woman's car keys in an incident that occurred the next day at the same location on South Hanover Street. Two other charges were dropped.

Scott, who was arrested near the hospital, was jailed for more than seven months while his case was adjudicated, and was eventually sentenced to time served and 100 hours of community service.

While he was in jail, Scott was interviewed at length by Patricia J. Lackey, a psychologist, who filed an evaluation in March for the Circuit Court. In the document, she recounts that Scott was born and raised in Baltimore by his mother, a daycare worker, and his stepfather. In school, Scott went as far as the 11th grade, when he was "taken off the roll for cutting" classes.

Nevertheless, Scott told Lackey that he "would like to go to college to become a lawyer," her report says. Scott, she wrote, "had just interviewed at the airport to work in a candy store prior to his arrest."

He said he liked writing poetry, and described himself as a loner. "I'd rather be by myself," he told Lackey. "It keeps me out of trouble."

But the psychologist pointed out in her report that Scott had been charged with drug offenses in August 2006 and October 2006 - charges that were later dropped. In July 2007, she noted, he received probation on charges of theft, malicious destruction and fleeing and speed violations.

Scott told Lackey that he had used his time in jail "to think about what I needed to do to turn myself around."

After being released, court records show, Scott was charged in another crime, on July 9 this year on South Curley Street in Baltimore, when a man was robbed by three individuals of a cell phone and a wallet containing cash and credit cards. The five charges against Scott, which included armed robbery and assault, were dropped when the victim was unable to identify him.

In the latest incident, Cpl. Michael Hill of the Baltimore County Police Department said investigators reviewed surveillance video of the Timonium light rail station taken at the time of the abduction of the teenagers, but he would not comment on whether the video helped police identify Scott as a suspect.

Anyone with information about Scott or the crime is asked to call county police at 410-307-2020 or Metro Crime Stoppers at 1-866-756-2587.

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