Letters

LETTERS

October 17, 2008

Palin right to intervene in trooper's ouster

The Baltimore Sun's editorial about Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's involvement in "Troopergate" tells half the story, which is just about par when it comes to such an obviously biased media outlet ("Palin's abuse of power," Oct. 14).

I think Mrs. Palin's attempts to get a former brother-in-law fired do more to show her good character than any lack of character.

The trooper was allegedly involved in Tasering his 11-year old son and making a serious and credible death threat against a member of Mrs. Palin's family.

In most places, that would be grounds for his immediate dismissal from the state police.

When the head of the police failed to act on such malfeasance, Mrs. Palin stepped in and sought to get the trooper fired, as was her right.

Douglas Klapec, Bethesda

If a governor taking action to fire a trooper who allegedly Tasered an 11-year-old is categorized as abusing power, I vote for Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin to continue this abuse of power in her and Sen. John McCain's efforts to clean up Washington.

Rodger J. Rudolph, Bel Air

Not violating the law isn't good enough

How low can we go? Gov. Sarah Palin and her friends have been celebrating the results of the Alaska legislative report that found that she did nothing illegal ("Palin's abuse of power," editorial, Oct. 14).

They tend not to mention, however, the report's further conclusion that her behavior amounted to an abuse of power and a violation of the state's ethics laws.

It should be clear by now that ethics are not a concern for this year's Republican ticket.

And what Mrs. Palin called an exoneration brought back memories of another famous Republican luminary to whom ethics was a foreign language. Does anyone remember, "I am not a crook"?

Let us hope that the bar for electing people to the highest offices in the land is a bit higher than "I did nothing illegal."

Sig Seidenman, Owings Mills

McCain's judgment is the larger concern

The spin has begun on the findings of a bipartisan ethics panel that found that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin abused her power in the "Troopergate" scandal ("Palin abused powers, Alaska ethics probe finds" (Oct. 11).

However, the story of greater importance is that Sen. John McCain has again shown poor judgment in choosing Mrs. Palin as his running mate.

In the last few weeks, Mr. McCain has shown poor judgment where the economic crisis is concerned.

How can voters trust this man to solve the many problems facing our nation today?

Paula Baranowski, Havre de Grace

Is Palin best woman the GOP has to offer?

As a female physician, I am incredulous that Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin is apparently the best person that Sen. John McCain and the Republican Party could offer for the office of vice president.

Her scurrilous attacks on Sen. Barack Obama, with their subliminal racist themes, are dangerous and divisive.

In all my years as an executive, a former soccer mom of three and a wife with 43 years of marriage under my belt, I have not had to resort to winks or "gosh-darn-its" to woo my colleagues to my point of view.

In my opinion, this empress has no clothes.

Barbara G. Cook, Baltimore

Obama's scary plan to redistribute wealth

Sen. Barack Obama was asked a question the other day by an Ohio man who owns his own plumbing business ("McCain makes debate a talk to 'Joe,'" Oct. 16). His answer is scary.

The plumber asked: "Your new tax plan is going to tax me more, isn't it?"

Mr. Obama replied: "It's not that I want to punish your success. I just want to make sure that everybody who is behind you, that they have a chance at success too. ... I think when you spread the wealth around, it's good for everybody."

What possible motivation does it give small business owners - or anybody else, for that matter - to work when they know that the harder they work, the more money they make, the more that money will be taken away from them and redistributed?

Rex Fisher, Pasadena

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