Roundup Kids' Books

October 12, 2008|By Liz Atwood

Trick or Treat on Monster Street

By Danny Schnitzlein and illustrator Matt Faulkner

Peachtree / 32 pages / ages 4-8 / $16.95

A boy who fears monsters and things that goes bump in the night dreads the approach of Halloween. While his older brothers dress in terrifying costumes, he wears a bunny suit when he goes out trick or treating. He thinks his worst fears are about to come true when he becomes lost in the woods. Creepy sounds, eerie trees, lightning and thunder send the boy running to the nearest house. There he encounters another trick-or-treater who seems like a normal kid - until he removes his mask.

Kids will get a kick of hearing how one little boy overcomes his fears and how his mean brothers get their due in this story told in delightful verse.

Where's My Mummy?

By Carolyn Crimi and illustrator John Manders

Candlewick Press / 32 pages / ages 4-8 / $15.99

Little Baby Mummy wants just one more game of hide and shriek before he goes to bed. When Big Mama Mummy doesn't find him, he goes looking for her instead - searching in the dark woods, the slithering swamp, the creepy cave, and by the squeaky tree. But just when Baby Mummy gets scared, you know who comes to the rescue.

Younger children, especially, will enjoy the whimsical illustrations of ghouls, skeletons and graveyards.

Boo, Bunny!

By Kathryn O. Galbraith and illustrator Jeff Mack

Harcourt / 40 pages / ages 4-8 / $16

Whooooo! Boooo! A shy bunny on Halloween night finds that trick-or-treating is a lot more fun with a friendly paw to hold. Told in rhyme with lots of opportunity for sound effects, the story will appeal to young readers. Bold and colorful illustrations accompany the text.

We're Off to Look for Aliens

By Colin McNaughton

Candlewick Press / 40 pages / ages 4-8 / $15.99

This book inside a book features a dad who writes a children's story about a man and his dog who fly into space to look for "ugly-bugly" aliens. Dad is happy when his new book is published and he gives it to his family to read. But the wife and kids aren't so sure it will be a best-seller. Kids and grown-ups will enjoy learning why in the surprise ending.

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