Swift picks

10 things not to miss from A&E editor Tim Swift

September 14, 2008|By Tim Swift

BOOKS

"Indignation" by Philip Roth:

Known lately for his older protagonists, the Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist returns to his literary roots for his latest novel, focusing on angst of youth rather than dissatisfaction of old age. The book follows young Marcus Messner as he comes of age during the Korean War at a conservative college in Ohio. In stores Tuesday.

GAMES

"Stars Wars::

The Force Unleashed" :

Mining an untold period of the Star Wars saga (they may run out of those soon), this slick game tells the story of Darth Vader's secret apprentice and their plot to hunt down the last of the valiant Jedi Knights. With top-notch graphics and sophisticated controls, players can really get immersed in the Star Wars world. In stores Tuesday.

DVD

"Pushing Daisies" Season One:

You could look at last year's Hollywood writers' strike as a mercy killing for a dreadful fall season. But amid the train wrecks, there were unassuming gems, such as Pushing Daisies, featuring a pie maker/reluctant detective (Lee Pace) who can briefly bring people back from the dead. Until the show returns Oct. 3, fans can catch up on the truncated first season. In stores Tuesday.

CONCERT

David Byrne :

The former Talking Heads frontman knows how to keep busy. He has a new album, he recently turned a building into a musical instrument and he's even designed bike racks for the streets of New York. The one-time MICA student keeps up the frantic pace this week with a concert at the Lyric Opera House. He performs at 8 p.m. Wednesday

For more: lyricoperahouse.com

THEATER

"The Matchmaker":

Hello Dolly!, the musical version of Thornton Wilder's romantic farce, may have more pop culture cachet, but the song-free play has charms all its own. And Center Stage doesn't skimp on the guffaws in this boisterous production. Opens Wednesday.

For more: center

stage.org

DVD

"Young @ Heart" :

Older people singing pop hits like "Staying Alive" sounds more like a quirky bit on The Tonight Show rather than a full-length film. But the members of the New England troupe, whose average age is 80, have such an endearing sense of camaraderie and dedication that they even make prison inmates tear up. In stores Tuesday.

ART

"The Indian Paintings":

by George de Forest Brush:

Drawing from his time in the American West, Brush provided a unique window into 19th-century Indian culture with his lifelike portraiture. D.C.'s National Gallery presents the first major exhibition of his work, which includes the rediscovered Aztec Sculptor. Opens today.

For more: nga.gov

FILM

"Ghost Town":

British comedian Ricky Gervais of HBO's Extras and The Office fame takes on an unlikely role in his latest film - the romantic lead. Gervais plays a dentist whose recent near-death experience has given him the ability to commune with the dead. It's a surprising romantic comedy that's charming without being sappy. In theaters Friday.

POP MUSIC

"Hey Ma" by James:

Although they had a hit with "Laid" in the '90s, the band from Manchester has never caught on in the States. But that could change with its new sweeping release, Hey Ma - James' first album in seven years. In stores Tuesday. They also perform Thursday at the 9:30 Club in D.C.

For more: 930club.com

EXHIBIT

"My Life In Fiction" by Kianga Ford:

The multimedia artist explores the art and accuracy of storytelling this week at the Contemporary Museum. Highlights include "Quiet Room" where visitors are encouraged to create "experiential narratives" amid an eerie soundtrack of gasps and wails. Opens Saturday.

For more: contemporary.org

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