Robert Pratt Wingard

Age 61 The architect was involved in historic preservation.

August 06, 2008|By Frederick N. Rasmussen | Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun Reporter

Robert Pratt Wingard, an architect who worked for more than 30 years with RTKL Associates Inc. and later established his own firm, died of heart failure July 30 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 61.

Mr. Wingard was born in Baltimore and raised at "Eldon," his parent's historic Lutherville home on Lincoln Avenue, which dated to 1855.

"It was built by Mr. Corkran, a wealthy lumber merchant, whose company, Stebbins Anderson, survives, who was also a political adviser to President Abraham Lincoln," said Robert W. Russo, a childhood friend and Mr. Wingard's personal representative.

"Lincoln, it was said, visited the home on several occasions, and the street was named in his honor," he said.

Mr. Wingard was a 1965 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in architecture from the University of Virginia in 1970. He was admitted to the American Institute of Architects in 1974.

He went to work in 1970 for RTKL, a Baltimore-based design firm, and was involved in a number of international projects that took him during the next 33 years to Canada, Belgium, France, Spain, Portugal, North Africa and the Far East.

"He had more free airline miles than a United Airlines pilot," Mr. Russo said.

Local projects that he designed included the IKEA store in White Marsh and several buildings on the Dundalk campus of the Community College of Baltimore County.

In 2003, Mr. Wingard, who was a vice president of RTKL, left the company and joined with Peter Underwood Andrews, another architect, in establishing the architectural firm of Underwood & Pratt.

"They used their middle names for the new firm, and they specialized in designing homes and remodeling projects," Mr. Russo said.

He had not retired at his death.

Interested in historic preservation, Mr. Wingard had been chairman of the Lutherville Historic Advisory Committee to the Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission.

Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. had recently appointed Mr. Wingard to a task force whose purpose is to establish proper guidelines for historic tax credits.

Mr. Wingard enjoyed traveling.

At his request, there are no services.

He has no immediate survivors.

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