Best Of This Week

July 27, 2008

Theater

Keeping Faith : 7:30 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays through Aug. 2 at the Chesapeake Arts Center, 194 Hammonds Lane in Brooklyn Park $10-$12. Call 410-636-6597 or go to chesa peakearts.org.

As one of the winning plays of the 2008 Baltimore Playwrights Festival, Keeping Faith showcases the story of an abducted bride-to-be and her detainment in an Arkansas hotel room. Her fiance and the police are in pursuit in this twisted family comedy. Written by Mark Scharf and directed by C.J. Crowe.

Meredith Cohn

Leisure

Baltimore City International Festival : Noon-9 p.m. Aug. 2 and Aug. 3., Poly/Western Complex, 1400 W. Cold Spring Lane. Free. Call 410-396-3141 or go to baltimore city.gov/ifest.

See the world in just two days. The festival includes demonstrations of Tai Chi; Krav Maga, an Israeli form of self defense; and Capoeria, a Brazilian form of martial arts that incorporates dance. Visitors can also watch belly dancing, African drums and dance, Indian Bollywood Dance, Korean Drum and Slavic dance performances, as well as watch a fashion show, soccer tournament and a U.S. citizenship ceremony. There also will be international foods available for purchase and other activities.

Jennifer Choi

DVD

Shine A Light : (Paramount). 34.99. Blu-Ray 39.99 Available Tuesday.

Martin Scorsese's full-speed-ahead concert documentary, staged at the Beacon Theatre in New York, features the Rolling Stones performing with undiminished vitality and defiance. Their shared stage and musical instincts are uncanny. If Scorsese is the maestro of multiple cameras, Jagger is the indisputable conductor of the show: he directs the Stones and their dynamite phalanx of backup singers and musicians, guests Christina Aguilera, Buddy Guy and Jack White III, and, in the most electrifying moments, the audience. Jagger can focus group feelings like a medicine man because, after four decades of performing together, he has such an intuitive connection with Ronnie Wood, Charlie Watts and the nonpareil Keith Richards. Jagger now brings an earthier, more comical air of sexual disgust to "Some Girls," real poignancy to "As Tears Goes By" and a starker current of existential vertigo to "Tumbling Dice." And Scorsese captures the outpouring of energy that can revitalize rock lovers en masse.

Michael Sragow

Classical

David Starobin, guitarist: 8 p.m. Thursday at An die Musik, 409 N. Charles St. $15 and $20. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andiemusiklive.com.

The classical guitar has a remarkably powerful advocate in David Starobin. His exemplary playing has prompted a who's who of contemporary composers to write pieces for him (among them, Elliott Carter and Milton Babbitt), and he has helped hone the skills of the next generation of guitarists as a longtime teacher at the Manhattan School of Music. In 1981, the Peabody-trained Starobin also founded Bridge Records, a company that has generated many notable recordings. For his recital at An die Musik this week, the guitarist will play a colorful assortment of works from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Tim Smith

Pop

Rock the Bells Festival: 11 a.m. today at Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent Parkway, Columbia. $40-$83. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com.

More than 20 of hip-hop's most creative stars take the stage at the all-day Rock the Bells Festival. Featured performers include Mos Def, Nas, Ghostface, Rakim and Method Man & Redman, all slated to perform new material along with their hits. Also, the legendary Tribe Called Quest returns to the lineup this year with special guest The Pharcyde.

Ishita Singh

TV

The Recruiter: 9 p.m. tomorrow. HBO

Another winning entry in HBO's Monday-night documentary series, this film follows one of the United States Army's most successful recruiters as he leads four high school seniors from the classroom into boot camp and military life. Directed by Oscar-nominated Edet Belzberg (Children Underground), the documentary provides rich insight into how the men and women fighting in Iraq got there - and where they come from. In this case, it is a tiny, Louisiana town outside of New Orleans filled with oil rigs, shrimp fishermen and Cajun culture - and not too many opportunities besides the military for some of its residents.

David Zurawik

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.