July 19, 2008

Lt. Gov. Brown to separate from his wife

Maryland Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown announced yesterday that he plans to separate from his wife of 15 years, Patricia Arzuaga. He did not provide a reason.

"We continue to have great admiration and respect for each other," they said in a joint statement. "We ask for everyone to respect our privacy during this time of transition for our family."

Brown and Arzuaga, both of whom grew up in New York and moved to Maryland after graduating from Harvard Law School, said that he will live close to their Mitchellville home so they both can be "actively engaged as parents" to their two children.

Brown served two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates and ran on the 2006 Democratic ticket with Gov. Martin O'Malley, taking office last year.

Laura Smitherman


Millard appointed Dixon's chief of staff

Mayor Sheila Dixon tapped yesterday Demaune Millard, her former director of intergovernmental affairs, to serve as her chief of staff.

The powerful position has been effectively vacant since Otis Rolley III left City Hall in October.

Millard, 35, has worked for Dixon since she became mayor in January last year.

"His skill and dedication has been critical in advancing our ambitious legislative agenda through City Hall and in Annapolis," Dixon said in a statement.

Before coming to City Hall, Millard worked for the American Public Transportation Association.

His was one of the most high-profile hires made by Dixon early on, and he has since served as the city's chief lobbyist with the General Assembly and the City Council.

City officials said Millard will continue to oversee governmental relations while also taking on the more traditional responsibilities of his new position, including the oversight of the day-to-day management of the mayor's office and communications.

Millard also served as a legislative liaison for the Maryland Department of Transportation. His salary will be $100,000.

John Fritze

Weiner joins Dixon legal team

Arnold M. Weiner, a well-known attorney who helped overturn Gov. Marvin Mandel's federal mail fraud and racketeering charges, has been added to Mayor Sheila Dixon's legal team.

Weiner made a name for himself as a prominent defense attorney in white-collar criminal cases in the 1970s and 1980s and will now serve as one of Dixon's personal lawyers. Defense attorney Dale Kelberman will continue to represent Dixon.

"The mayor has consulted with me, and I've agreed to head up her defense team," Weiner said. "I happen to think she's being dealt with unfairly, and I think she's been a great mayor for the city."

The Maryland state prosecutor's office has been investigating Dixon's tenure as City Council president for more than two years. The investigation has focused, in part, on gifts Dixon received from a prominent contractor who got tax breaks and other incentives from the city.

A Baltimore grand jury started hearing from witnesses in the case last month after prosecutors raided the mayor's home. The prosecutor's office has repeatedly declined to comment in the case.

Among many notable cases, Weiner defended Mandel and former Rep. Edward A. Garmatz in criminal cases in the late 1970s.

Mandel, a Democrat, was convicted on federal mail fraud and racketeering charges in 1977, a verdict that was overturned with Weiner's help.

Garmatz was accused of taking bribes while serving in the House, but the case was dismissed in 1978 after the government's evidence was found to be questionable.

Sterling Clifford, a spokesman for Dixon, referred questions to the mayor's attorneys.

John Fritze

Federal court

Heroin dealer sentenced to life

A Baltimore man has been sentenced to life in prison for his role in a heroin-dealing conspiracy.

Kevin Hickman, 48, was convicted in April in federal court. At his sentencing, the judge said Hickman is a career criminal who had previously been convicted of heroin distribution.

A six-month wiretap investigation recorded Hickman going to pick up 30 grams of heroin from Fat Cat's Variety Store in Baltimore. Minutes after he picked up the drugs, authorities found 32 grams of heroin in his car. Prosecutors said police found 17 vials of heroin in the gas tank.

Associated Press

Howard County


Man hunted in bank robbery

Howard County police are searching for a man who robbed a bank in Columbia yesterday.

Just before noon, a man entered the Wachovia Bank branch in the 8800 block of Centre Park Drive, police said. He approached a teller, implied that he had a gun and demanded cash before fleeing with an undisclosed amount of money. No one was injured, police said, and no one reported seeing a weapon.

Anyone who was in the area around the time of the robbery or who has information is asked to call police at 410-313-3200. A reward of $1,000 is being offered for information.

Tyeesha Dixon

Carroll County


Man, 25, killed in 2-vehicle crash

A Carroll County man was killed yesterday morning in a two-vehicle crash in Westminster, according to state police.

Ryan Patrick Healy, 25, of the 2000 block of Hanover Pike in Hampstead was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Healy was westbound in a 2002 Toyota Corolla on Route 31 near the Windsor Drive intersection when he crossed the double yellow line and collided with a tractor-trailer going east, police said.

The driver of the tractor-trailer was not injured, police said.

Arin Gencer

Carroll County


Mother, daughter displaced by fire

A mother and daughter were treated for smoke inhalation at Carroll Hospital Center yesterday morning after a midnight fire caused heavy damage to their Hampstead townhouse, authorities said.

State fire marshals are investigating the cause of the blaze that started on the front of the house in the 600 block of Clearview Ave., said Deputy State Fire Marshal Tim Warner.

A smoke alarm woke Francine Boothe, 47, and her daughter, Victoria, 17. They escaped through the front door, Warner said.

Damage was estimated at $150,000.

Ellie Baublitz

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