Betting probe led to firing of O's scout

Gambling

Veteran Marr had been team employee since 2004

July 12, 2008|By Jeff Barker, Dan Connolly and Roch Kubatko | Jeff Barker, Dan Connolly and Roch Kubatko,Sun reporters

An Orioles scout was fired late last month because he has been linked to a probe into illegal gambling, according to several baseball sources.

Alan Marr, who was one step below amateur scouting director Joe Jordan, had been with the Orioles since 2004.

Major League Baseball officials spoke with the Orioles about Marr's alleged involvement in the ring, and the club decided to fire him, two baseball sources told The Sun last night. The Orioles acted after seeking legal advice on how to proceed, one of the sources said.

Orioles owner Peter Angelos declined to comment last night, referring inquiries to president Andy MacPhail. "I can confirm for you he is no longer in our employ," MacPhail said.

The Sun first reported Marr's termination on July 5, and on Friday SI.com, citing anonymous sources, reported that Marr's name had surfaced from Major League Baseball's investigative unit in conjunction with a federal probe into illegal gambling.

MLB created the investigative unit this year after the prompting of former Sen. George Mitchell in his December report on the use of illegal performance-enhancing drugs.

Federal law enforcement authorities and the New York Police Department are believed to be involved in the probe, one of the sources said.

Attempts to reach Marr last night were unsuccessful. Marr declined to comment when reached at his home in Sarasota, Fla., the Associated Press reported. MLB spokesman Pat Courtney also declined to comment.

Marr was once a scout for the San Francisco Giants. Baseball suspends club officials for a year for betting on baseball games. Lifetime bans are issued if baseball finds that the official or player had a role in the game.

In November 2006, Frank Falzarano, a former scout for the Washington Nationals and the Giants, was accused of being an operative in an international Internet gambling ring. There was no evidence Falzarano tried to fix games.

jeff.barker@baltsun.com

dan.connolly@baltsun.com

roch.kubatko@baltsun.com

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.