The Week That Was

July 06, 2008

Land row in Roland Park

Roland Park residents are opposing plans by the Baltimore Country Club to sell some of its land to Keswick Multi-Care Center, which plans to build a $195 million continuing-care retirement community. "This is truly like a volcano erupting," said Philip Spevak, president of the Roland Park Civic League.

Fire Department rating its responses

Baltimore Fire Chief James S. Clack said the city Fire Department will launch a multitiered response system to save the city money spent sending unnecessary equipment on nonemergency calls and to increase the safety of emergency responders and other drivers on the road. Under the new policy, calls to the department will be deemed "hot," "warm" or "cold."

Currie's defense gets funds setback

The state attorney general's office has said that Sen. Ulysses Currie may not use campaign funds to pay for his legal defense in a federal investigation. Recently, the Prince George's County Democrat asked the State Board of Elections whether he could use campaign funds in the federal investigation into his work for a Lanham-based grocery chain.

Law eases soldiers' citizenship path

A law signed by President Bush allows those serving in the military to use the fingerprints they gave when they enlisted to process naturalization paperwork, rendering unnecessary the deadly trip Spc. Kendell Frederick took near Tikrit in 2005. The Kendell Frederick Citizenship Assistance Act will help make it easier for foreign-born members of the military to fill out citizenship applications.

Agency to track U.S. diseases

A Fort Detrick unit that has tracked diseases threatening U.S. forces overseas for more than a half-century will now assess infections that endanger civilians at home, too, officials announced. Renamed the National Center for Medical Intelligence, the agency will gather information on diseases and contaminants that could make their way through food, animals, travelers, immigrants and troops.

Board to review selection process

The Board of Public Works agreed to clarify the appointment process for advisers to the state retirement and pension system after complaints that a nominee who would have been the first African-American in that post was treated poorly. Comptroller Peter Franchot and state Sen. Catherine E. Pugh said that Larry E. Jennings Jr., co-founder of a private equity firm, withdrew his name from consideration.

Howard invests in solar energy

The East Columbia library unveiled 24 panels of solar receptors in the latest attempt to push energy-saving alternative technology. The panels are expected to generate about 30 percent of the building's energy, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman says.

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