Salmon stands up to Mexican flavorings

dinner tonight

June 04, 2008|By Renee Enna | Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune

With warm weather comes delicious fresh wild salmon. Sockeye is in season from mid-May to September, but any variety, wild or farmed, will work in this simple recipe with Mexican flavorings.

The salmon can be grilled or broiled, depending on the weather. It's paired with a zesty pineapple salsa. If you like, you can add more zip to the dish with a seafood rub for the fish.

Place the salmon skin-side down. When it's done, it should lift easily from the skin.

Switch the herb in the salsa (to cilantro or basil, for instance) for a different flavor twist.

Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Sock-It-to-Me Salmon and Salsa

Serves 2 -- Total time: 18 minutes

2 sockeye salmon fillets

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil (divided use)

2 teaspoons spicy rub (optional; see note)

1/2 teaspoon salt (divided use)

freshly ground pepper

1 can (8 ounces) diced pineapple, drained (see note)

1 green onion, minced

2 tablespoons chopped fresh mint

1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice

2 teaspoons minced jalapeno or to taste

Heat a grill or broiler. Brush salmon with 1 teaspoon of the olive oil; season with rub, if using, 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and pepper to taste.

Grill salmon, turning once, until just cooked, about 8 minutes. Meanwhile, combine the drained pineapple, green onion, remaining 2 teaspoons of the olive oil, mint, lime juice, jalapeno, remaining 1/4 teaspoon of the salt and pepper to taste; serve with the salmon.

Note: We grilled one fillet with a Jamaican jerk rub and liked the way it paired with the sweet-hot salsa. If the pineapple chunks are too large, you may want to cut them into smaller pieces.

Per serving: 398 calories, 19 grams fat, 3 grams saturated fat, 107 milligrams cholesterol, 16 grams carbohydrate, 39 grams protein, 669 milligrams sodium, 2 grams fiber

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