How Horses Got Their Names

Preakness Preview

May 17, 2008|By SANDRA MCKEE

Macho Again: Ownership played with the name of the sire, Macho Uno.

Tres Borrachos: Owners John Greely IV and Philip Houchens and trainer C. Beau Greely appear to be having fun. The name translates to "Three drunks."

Icabad Crane: Named for the character in "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" who is scared by the headless horseman.

Yankee Bravo: Named after his sire, Yankee Gentleman.

Racecar Rhapsody: Owner Jerry Carroll sold Turfway Park for $36.9 million and turned around and spent $22 million on Kentucky Speedway. "I've never even seen a car race," he said, explaining the Racecar part. But he has heard his girlfriend, a concert pianist, play and combined that with the horse's dam, Reflect the Music, to come up with Rhapsody.

Big Brown: Of course, is named as a tribute to United Parcel Service. The horse's original and now minority owner Paul Pompa Jr. also owns a trucking company that has UPS as a client.

Kentucky Bear: Named as a combination of being a Kentucky-bred and for his owner, Danny "Bear" Dion, who runs Bear Stables.

Stevil: Owner Robert LaPenta has a friend named Steve, who in good fun he always calls "Evil Steve." From that came Stevil.

Riley Tucker: Named for trainer Bill Mott's son, also named Riley Tucker.

Giant Moon: His sire is Giant's Causeway, and his dam is Moonlightandbeauty.

Gayego: From the name of the native people and language ("Gallego") of Galicia, the Northwestern region of Spain.

Hey Byrn: Owner Beatrice Oxenberg, 87, named him for her late husband, who came home from their smoked fish and seafood business in New York one night long ago and said, "I bought a racehorse." To which she responded, "A racehorse? You're in the seafood business."

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