Aumann's 5-hitter lifts S. River

No. 12 South River 6 No. 9 Old Mill 3

Baseball

May 14, 2008|By Pat O'Malley | Pat O'Malley,SUN REPORTER

Junior left-hander Eric Aumann blew through No. 9 Old Mill, allowing five hits and retiring the last 12 batters to lead No. 12 South River to a 6-3 victory in the Class 4A East Regional quarterfinals in Millersville yesterday.

South River (14-7) advanced to the 4A East semifinals, but must wait for an opponent to get through the first round, which was delayed by Friday's rain and then played yesterday. The quarterfinals likely will be today.

Thanks to first-round byes, the Seahawks and Old Mill (14-6), played their quarterfinal early.

Aumann (7-1) settled down after giving up two runs in the first and one more in the second as the Patriots staked their senior left-hander, Brady Feigl, to a 3-0 lead. Feigl (5-3) couldn't hold it and took the loss.

"Our kids lost here the last time we played them and could have folded when we got behind 3-0, but didn't," South River coach Ken B. Dunn said. "Eric was outstanding, and we got some timely hitting."

The 6-foot-4, 140-pound Aumann gave up his fifth and final hit in the fourth, a leadoff double to Matt Wade.

"It was my first playoff win, and I did the best I could do, " said Aumann, who struck out seven and walked two on 117 pitches.

"I didn't realize I got the last 12 batters in a row. I had good command. That two-run single I gave up to [Andrew] Haab in the first inning was off a hanging knuckleball. My knuckleball wasn't very good today."

South River gave Aumann all the runs he needed in a four-run third inning highlighted by Jake Harkey's two-out, two-run double to center.

"I hit a hanging curveball, saw it and hit it hard," said Harkey.

Brandon Ring's second hit drove in the fifth run for the Seahawks and a double steal in a first-and-third situation in the seventh with one out produced the sixth run.pat.omalley@baltsun.com

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.