Donald Fair Sr., 86

Veteran, attorney

April 26, 2008|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

Donald Theodore Armacost Fair Sr., a retired Baltimore attorney who practiced law for more than 50 years, died of kidney failure April 18 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 86.

Mr. Fair was born in Baltimore and raised in Govans. After graduating from City College in 1933, he worked as an insurance collector for Maryland Casualty Co. until enlisting in the Army in 1942. He was discharged after the war ended and studied law under the GI Bill of Rights at the old Mount Vernon Law School.

To support his family while he attended law school, he owned a bar on West Pratt Street and worked summers at Lark's Inn, a Riviera Beach restaurant. He also conducted law classes for servicemen at Aberdeen Proving Ground. Admitted to the Maryland Bar in the 1940s, Mr. Fair maintained a general law practice and was a partner in the firm of Fair Vidali Wagner and Evering, which was located in the old Tower Building on East Baltimore Street.

Before retiring in the late 1990s for health reasons, Mr. Fair maintained an office in Hampden.

"His whole life was the law, and he was happy just being a lawyer. He liked working because it kept him young," said his wife of 65 years, the former Catherine Evelyn Talbott.

Mr. Fair lived on Fairfield Avenue in Mount Washington for 48 years before moving to Lutherville a decade ago.

For years, Mr. Fair joined his son in playing Santa Claus and helped distribute gifts to needy families in Essex. He was an avid camper and vegetable gardener.

He was also a member of VFW Post 1529 and Amicable St. John Lodge No. 25.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. today at Burgee-Henss- Seitz Funeral Home, 3631 Falls Road.

Also surviving are two sons, Donald T.A. Fair Jr. of Lutherville and David Fair of Charleston, S.C.; a daughter, Linda Fair Wagner of Phoenix, Ariz.; 10 grandchildren; and 11 great-grandchildren.

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