Math teacher wins award

EDUCATION NOTES

April 20, 2008

Southern High School math teacher Joshua Dorsey has been selected as winner of the 2008 Maryland Instructional Computers Coordinators Association Outstanding Educator Using Technology Award.

The annual award honors one teacher who has demonstrated outstanding achievement and leadership in implementing technology to improve education.

Southern High School Principal Maryalice Todd said Dorsey's biggest strength isn't just his ability to use technology effectively. Rather, she said, it's his ability to blend technology with a human approach that creates strong bonds with his students.

"Josh not only values technology but also values relationships with his students," Todd said. "He is well-liked by faculty and students alike."

Dorsey, who teaches Advanced Placement calculus, calculus III and precalculus, will receive his award at the annual MICCA Spring Conference in Baltimore from April 29 to May 1.

As part of the award, Dorsey will receive $1,000 in technological equipment and give a 20-minute presentation highlighting how he integrates educational technology into the teaching and learning process.

Teachers take part in panel

Two Anne Arundel County Public Schools educators were slated to be panelists yesterday at the Maryland Latino Education Policy Summit at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Tracey Prater, assistant principal at Tyler Heights Elementary School, was scheduled to participate in the morning session, "Building a Strong Foundation in Elementary Education -- Grades K-5." Dr. Marcianna Rodriguez, ESOL teacher at Annapolis High School, was to be a panelist at the afternoon session, "Ensuring Graduation and a High Quality Education in High School -- Grades 9-12."

The one-day conference included Hispanic leaders, legislators, policymakers, educators, students, parents and community groups to discuss the needs of Hispanics in pre-kindergarten through post-secondary education in Maryland.

Program celebrates 10 years

Anne Arundel Community College celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Chesapeake Area Consortium for Higher Education (CACHE) for physical therapist assistants last week.

CACHE administers the Physical Therapist Assistant Associate of Applied Science degree program for students at Anne Arundel Community College, Chesapeake College and the College of Southern Maryland.

Physical therapist assistants work in fields such as neurology, orthopedics, pediatrics, sports injuries geriatrics and acute care. The U.S. Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 44 percent increase in demand through 2014.

AACC students in art contest

Five Anne Arundel Community College students are competing for national recognition and more than $1,000 in cash prizes in the 22nd annual Student Art Competition sponsored by the League for Innovation in the Community College.

AACC contestants are:

Kristen Masters of Upper Marlboro, a visual arts major who created Study of a Man, a graphite-on-paper artwork;

Maria Spolnicki of Gambrills, a visual arts major who painted a watercolor, A Hundred and Forty Juicy Grapefruit Squares;

Richard Starr of Crofton, a business administration major who sculpted The Blue Man from clay.

Sarah Straub of Annapolis, a visual arts major who created Hierarchy of Deceit, a mixed-media artwork on paper.

Robert Weston of Annapolis, a graphic arts major who experimented with alternative photo processes and the use of film in the digital age for his work Down the Ocean.

Winners of the national competition will be announced May 20.

The league is a consortium of more than 800 community colleges and organizations nationwide, in 12 countries and two territories.

Entire class passes exam

All 27 students in the Anne Arundel Community College radiologic technology Class of 2007 passed the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists certification exam the first time.

This is the eighth consecutive year that members of the radiologic technology program posted a perfect pass rate.

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