Another dimension to Hitchcock

April 04, 2008|By Chris Kaltenbach | Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter

Alfred Hitchcock and funny glasses: What's not to love? The Charles Theatre's not-to-be-missed retrospective of Hitchcock's films continues this weekend with 1954's Dial M for Murder, presented in all its original three-dimensional splendor. The film stars Ray Milland as a cad who decides his wife (Grace Kelly) needs to be killed and blackmails someone into doing it. But things don't work out as planned. Hitchcock, almost alone among the directors who worked in 3-D during the process' brief Golden Age, tried using it for dramatic effect instead of simply having characters throw things at the audience. Showtime is noon tomorrow, with encores set for 7 p.m. Monday and 9 p.m. Thursday. Tickets are $6 tomorrow, $8 other times. Information: 410-727-3456 or thecharles.com.

Spring Film Series

The Maryland Film Festival's Spring Film Series concludes Tuesday with Laurie Collyer's 2006 Sherrybaby, starring Maggie Gyllenhaal as a recently released prisoner trying to reconnect with her young daughter, with decidedly mixed results. Collyer and editor Curtiss Clayton will be on hand to present the film. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. in Falvey Hall of the Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $10, free to MICA students, faculty and staff and Friends of the Festival. Information: 410-752-8083 or mdfilm fest.com.

`Tin Men' at hostel

Barry Levinson's 1987 Tin Men, the story of a pair of dueling aluminum-siding salesmen hitting the streets in early 1960s Baltimore, will have a free showing at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Baltimore Hostel, 17 W. Mulberry St. Information: baltimorehostel.org or 410-576-8880.

Meet `Pip & Zastrow'

Local filmmakers Victoria Bruce and Karin Hayes' Pip & Zastrow: An American Friendship, a documentary look at Annapolitans Roger "Pip" Moyer and Zastrow Simms and how their enduring friendship crossed racial lines at a time when the city desperately needed such colorblind leadership, will be shown Tuesday at Howard Community College, 10901 Little Patuxent Parkway in Columbia. Showtime is 7 p.m. in the Kittleman Room on the campus. Admission is free, but seating is limited. For information or to register in advance: 410-772-4896 or www.howardcc.edu.

Bette Davis tribute

The American Film Institute's salute to Bette Davis, commemorating the centennial of her birth (April 5, 1908), kicks off tonight at Silver Spring's Silver Theatre with a 7 p.m. screening of All About Eve. The Oscar-winning 1950 film features Davis as Margo Channing, a middle-aged actress reluctantly having the spotlight taken from her by rising young star Eve Harrington (Anne Baxter). Encore screenings of All About Eve are set for 3:30 p.m. tomorrow, 1 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Tuesday. The centenary tribute continues April 12 with 1932's The Cabin in the Cotton, in which Davis' character playfully drawls, "I'd like to kiss you, but I just washed my hair," and 1934's Fog Over Frisco, in which Davis plays a high-living socialite with a penchant for getting into trouble. The double feature begins at 4 p.m., with an encore set for 6:30 p.m. April 14. The Silver is at 8633 Colesville Road. Information: 301-495-6720 or afi.com.

chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com

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