John S. Kerns Jr.

[ Age 74 ] Printing executive was a member of several patriotic societies.

January 23, 2008|By Frederick N. Rasmussen

John S. "Jack" Kerns Jr., a retired printing executive who was active in several patriotic organizations, died Monday of heart failure at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 74.

Mr. Kerns was born in Baltimore and raised in Garrison. He was a 1952 graduate of the Boys' Latin School and earned a bachelor's degree from Babson College in Massachusetts in 1957.

He served in the Army with the Armed Forces Special Weapons Project, where he attained the rank of corporal.

Mr. Kerns began his business career working for Cluett Peabody & Co., manufacturers of Arrow shirts, in New York City and Pittsburgh. From 1959 to 1970, he worked in Baltimore for American Bank Stationery Co.

In 1970, he established National Graphic Arts Inc. and later NGA Printing Co. in the Raleigh Industrial Park. He retired in 1988.

Mr. Kerns was a past president and board member of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution in Maryland, and he had been assistant secretary to the general board of the Sons of the Revolution.

He was a member of the Society of 1812 in Maryland, the Society of Colonial Wars and the St. George's Society.

Mr. Kerns had been an alumni president and board member at Boys' Latin School for eight years. He received the school's Outstanding Alumni Award in 1998.

He was a member of the Maryland Club, Johns Hopkins Club, Wednesday Club, Bachelors Cotillon and the Retired Men's Club of Elkridge. An avid outdoorsman, wildfowl hunter and fisherman, Mr. Kerns enjoyed collecting working duck decoys.

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 11 a.m. Friday at the Roman Catholic Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5300 N. Charles St.

Survivors include his wife of 48 years, the former Stephanie Culbertson; two sons, John S. Kerns III of Charleston, S.C., and Barton G. Kerns of Finksburg; a daughter, Stephanie K. Spear of Lutherville; 11 grandchildren; and a great-granddaughter.

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