A Little Christmas Jeer

Shoptalk

December 23, 2007|By [TIM SWIFT]

The sentimental overload of the Christmas season can be too much for even the sappiest souls trapped at family gatherings. Luckily, a jolt of dark satire about faraway locales (that aren't Aunt Janice's den) is only a coffee table away. Here are some of the new standouts that can be found at most major bookstores:

1. Borat Touristic Guidings to Minor Nation of U.S. and A. / Touristic Guidings to Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan

Author:

Borat Sagdiyev

Price:

$24.99

Why we like it:

The raunchy movie has been encapsulated into a coffee book. You can follow Borat as he finds the best America has to offer including Dollywood and "All You Can Eating Buffets." On the flip side, readers get a crash course in Kazakhstan (well, Borat's insane version of it). Like the movie, this book isn't for the young or the squeamish.

2. Our Dumb World

Author:

The Onion

Price:

$27.99

Why we like it:

It calls Baltimore "America's very well-hidden gem." But it does admit it's undiscovered because "few are willing to venture past the crime-scene tape." This fake atlas has several laugh-out-loud moments (and a few cringe-inducing ones, too). It works on many levels whether you read deep into the satiric copy or just skim the irreverent headings (i.e. Mauritius: A Island Nation Not a Disease).

3. San Sombrero:A Land of Carnivals, Cocktails and Coups (Jetlag Travel Guide)

Authors:

Santo Cilauro, Tom Gleisner and Rob Sitch

Price:

$13.95

Why we like it:

One of a number of Jetlag Travel Guides, San Sombrero looks like a Fodor's guide, but it certainly doesn't read like one. An inspired parody of those handy books that your over-prepared friends force on you at vacation time, its maps are dotted with icons like "mass grave" and "place of no interest." It also includes bits of advice like: "In restaurants, be wary of ordering a `kids meal' -- this will often involve baby goat."

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.