Agnes C. Hare, 86

Homemaker

December 13, 2007

Agnes C. Hare, a homemaker who enjoyed cooking and entertaining family and friends, died Wednesday of complications from a broken hip at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The longtime Pinehurst on the Bay resident was 86.

Agnes C. Matthews was born in Baltimore and raised in Pigtown. After graduating from Seton High School in 1939, she worked for several years at Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co.

She was married in 1941 to Clifford A. Hare Jr., a pharmacist who owned Kinnamon & Breile Pharmacy at Park Avenue and Madison Street. They lived for several years above the pharmacy before moving to the Anne Arundel County community in 1947.

Mr. Hare died in 1973.

Mrs. Hare was known for her sour beef and dumplings, and for steamed crabs that were caught fresh from a pier at her bayside home.

"She'd marinate her beef for several days and then after cooking it, she'd serve it with at least four dozen potato dumplings," said Mary Gail Hare, a daughter-in-law and Sun reporter.

"She made her steamed crabs with vinegar and Old Bay and several secret ingredients that no one knows about."

"She was a true Marylander. She loved her crabs and beer," said a daughter, Christina M. Woodhouse of Cedartown, Ga. "She made her crab cakes with not much breading and plenty of backfin crabmeat."

Mrs. Hare enjoyed taking cruises and dancing. "We have a picture of her in a go-go cage," said Mary Gail Hare.

Mrs. Hare was a communicant of Our Lady of the Chesapeake Roman Catholic Church, 8325 Ventnor Road in Pasadena, where a Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 10 a.m. tomorrow.

Also surviving are three sons, Clifford A. Hare III of Westminster, David F. Hare of Middle River and Mark R. Hare of Pasadena; three other daughters, Carol A. Moran of Parkville, and Jane L. Gilligan and Barbara J. Gookin, both of Pasadena; a sister, Clara Matthews of Baltimore; 17 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.

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