Mike Preston's Report Card

November 19, 2007|By MIKE PRESTON

QUARTERBACK C+

It was a vintage Kyle Boller performance.He made some nice plays but also several poor decisions.He did give the offense a spark,but his nervous feet are scary.

RUNNING BACKS B

Willis McGahee rushed for 102 yards on 21 carries.The Ravens had balance on offense with the passing game,which made McGahee more effective.He also is really good at pass blocking.

OFFENSIVE LINE D

The Ravens allowed six sacks.Right tackle Adam Terry was horrendous in the first half but rebounded in the second. Chris Chester had a poor day at left guard and made Browns defensive end Robaire Smith look like Randy White.

RECEIVERS B

Let's be realistic: The Browns have a terrible secondary, but at least the Ravens took advantage of it. The Ravens had 240 passing yards, led by Derrick Mason and Quinn Sypniewski with six catches each.

DEFENSIVE LINE C

The Ravens started to wear down in the second half,particu- larly on the right side against the run.Browns running back Jamal Lewis was in and out of the holes quickly.

LINEBACKERS B

Middle linebacker Ray Lewis was the best player on the field. He had 16 tackles and returned an interception for a touch- down.Outside linebackers Terrell Suggs and Bart Scott com- bined for 17 tackles.

SECONDARY D

Cornerback Chris McAlister lost receiver Braylon Edwards several times,and the Ravens couldn?t make a play in the defensive backfield when they needed it most.

SPECIAL TEAMS F

The Ravens were gluttons for punishment because they kept kicking to return specialist Joshua Cribbs.The Browns? average drive started at their 41-yard line.Ed Reed doesn?t know when to run under a punt or fair catch it.

COACHING C-

The Ravens had no offense in the first half but gained some rhythm in the second.The Ravens needed better clock man- agement on their last possession in regulation,and someone should have ordered Matt Stover to stop kicking it to Cribbs.

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