Man, 42, and teen charged in killing

CRIME WATCH

November 17, 2007|By Justin Fenton | Justin Fenton,SUN REPORTER

As a 15-year-old boy and a 42-year-old man waited for a drug dealer to arrive in the early-morning darkness, police say, the two hatched a murder plot.

The teen brought the handgun, and the man pulled the trigger, according to charging documents in Anne Arundel County. And as their victim lay bleeding in his old Lexus, the pair robbed him, drove the car into the woods and torched it, then headed to the man's house to smoke crack cocaine.

Police said that Ross Ethan Womick, a ninth-grader, told them that he was with Wayne Lewis Milburn Sr., when the man fatally shot 23-year-old Krey Jermaine Green.

Milburn was identified as the father of one of Womick's former classmates at Old Mill High School.

Green's skeletal remains were discovered Oct. 30 in the burned Lexus. Milburn was charged Wednesday night with first- and second-degree murder.

Womick has been charged as an adult with first-degree murder, arson and two counts of assault.

Family friends said they were shocked to hear of Womick's arrest, describing him as a shy kid who was trustworthy and didn't show a violent streak. He had bipolar disorder and was being home-schooled.

"He's a good boy. I trust him with my kids, trust him in the house. He ain't never hurt nobody," said Stacy Labrador, 39, who visited the Womick home with her husband yesterday.

Womick's family -- including his mother, who sobbed during her son's bail review hearing -- declined to comment.

Womick, who at the hearing was described as a crack addict, told police that he and Milburn met near the former Crownsville Hospital Center to buy crack cocaine from Green, and that Womick gave Milburn a .22-caliber handgun that he had purchased a day earlier.

Womick told police that the plan was simple -- shoot and kill Green, and take his drugs and money, according to court papers.

As Green retrieved the drugs in his car, he was shot in the head at least once through the driver's-side window of his vehicle, police said.

Milburn then pushed Green's body to the passenger seat and drove to the wooded area behind South Shore Baptist Church in the 700 block of Herald Harbor Road, according to court documents.

Womick told officers that he drove to Milburn's home to get a gas can and filled it at the Osprey service center on Generals Highway, records show. He met Milburn behind the church, where the car with Green inside was doused with gasoline. The gas can and handgun were thrown into the car as it burned, police said.

Afterward, Womick told police, he and Milburn went to Milburn's house and got high.

The cashier at the service station contradicted part of the police account, telling The Sun yesterday that she had sold gas to an older man that morning.

She said she is familiar with Womick and didn't see him that day. "I remember it because it was so early," said Carrie Rasmussen, who said police interviewed her Oct. 31.

"We open at 6, and [the older man] had been there since 5:45 waiting for us to open. He said his car had broken down, that it had run out of gas."

Cpl. Mark Shawkey, a spokesman for the Anne Arundel County police, said the case remains active and would not discuss how police were led to Milburn and Womick.

In April 2006, Milburn, a father of two, received a two-year suspended sentence and supervised probation after police found a handgun and what appeared to be an explosive device in his pickup truck.

Appearing on a monitor from the Jennifer Road Detention Center at his bail review hearing, Womick wore a green jumpsuit and glasses. His head was shaved, and he had a goatee. His public defender told District Judge Robert C. Wilcox that Womick had been under the influence of Milburn when the incident occurred and asked that they be kept apart at the detention center.justin.fenton@baltsun.com

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