Two men die in separate shootings in Baltimore

CRIME WATCH

August 27, 2007|By Julie Bykowicz and Richard Irwin

Eastern District police responding to shots fired on a street near Green Mount Cemetery yesterday afternoon found a bleeding young man, who died a short time later at a hospital.

The man's name was withheld pending notification of family members, police said. No arrest had been made and police knew of no motive for the city's latest reported slaying, the 204th of the year. About 2 p.m., police found the victim, believed to be in his early 20s, lying in the 1900 block of Cecil Ave. in the city's East Baltimore Midway neighborhood across the street from the cemetery. Police called an ambulance, and the victim was taken to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he died shortly after arriving there.

In a separate homicide, a Baltimore man who might have been shooting at someone was himself shot to death early yesterday, city police said.

Andre McNair, 28, was found about 1:45 a.m. outside in the 3500 block of E. Baltimore St., police said. He had been shot several times, said Officer Nicole Monroe, a police spokeswoman. McNair was taken to Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead at 2:22 a.m., Monroe said.

Police found a gun on him, she said, leading them to believe he might also have fired shots.

Monroe, who described McNair as an East Baltimore native, said police did not want to disclose his address for fear of retaliation against his family.

Court records show that a man of the same name and age pleaded guilty in 2000, 2001 and again in 2006 to carrying a handgun. The first time he was sentenced to 1 1/2 years in prison, and to two years the second and third times. In 2004, a city jury acquitted McNair of attempted-murder charges, court records show.

Metro Crime Stoppers at 410-276-8888 is offering a reward of up to $2,000 for information leading to an arrest and indictment in either of the slayings.

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