O'Donnell making bid for `Price' hosting job

June 19, 2007|By Martin Miller | Martin Miller,Los Angeles Times

Sometimes when the universe closes a door, it opens up what's behind showcase No. 2!

Having recently flown from her perch on The View, Rosie O'Donnell confirmed on her personal blog that she is probably meeting with producers this week about the possibility of succeeding Bob Barker as host of CBS' franchise daytime game show The Price Is Right.

Officials at CBS were unavailable for comment, but the network has struggled for months in trying to find a suitable replacement for the iconic Barker, who was the face of the hit morning show for 35 years. Barker's last original episode aired Friday.

O'Donnell has made no secret of her desire to take over the game show, but CBS' interest is apparently a new development. In earlier blog postings, O'Donnell had written that the network didn't "want me, boo hoo."

CBS has been auditioning possible replacements for several months. The three leading candidates up to now have been George Hamilton, the famously tan film and television star; Mark Steines, co-host of Entertainment Tonight; and Todd Newton, best known for E! Entertainment programs such as Coming Attractions but who also hosts a live version of The Price Is Right at Bally's in Las Vegas.

Even if eventually offered the job, it remains unclear whether O'Donnell would be willing to relocate to Los Angeles, where the show is taped. She lives outside New York with her partner and their four children. They also have a home in Miami.

Barker seemed to endorse O'Donnell over the weekend after collecting a 19th Daytime Emmy Award but wasn't sure CBS wanted a female host. In an interview earlier this year about his potential replacement, Barker said this:

"I always compare game show hosts to pies. Some people like lemon, some like chocolate, some like cherry. We're all different, and we work in different ways."

Martin Miller writes for the Los Angeles Times.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.