Hans D. Heyck, 84

Aerospace engineer

June 16, 2007

Hans Dietrich Heyck, a design engineer and fan of vintage airplanes, died Wednesday of a stroke at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The longtime resident of Phoenix, Baltimore County, was 84.

Mr. Heyck was born and raised in Paehl, Germany. He was drafted into the Germany army in 1942 and was captured while serving in Tunisia.

He was sent to prisoner-of-war camps in Kentucky and Oklahoma before being repatriated in 1945.

Mr. Heyck completed his training as a design engineer at the Munich Technical Institute and in 1954 immigrated to Winchester, Mass., where he went to work in the aerospace industry.

In 1961, he moved to Baltimore and went to work as a design engineer for AAI Corp in Cockeysville.

During his more than three-decade career with the defense contractor, projects he was associated with included modifications to B-52 bombers, the Dome Stinger missile trainer and the Apollo space program.

He retired in 1991.

Until selling his Taylorcraft, a five-passenger, single-engine airplane that was constructed in 1955, Mr. Heyck enjoyed flying his family on trips to Canada, Maine, Kentucky and Ocean City.

"He enjoyed modifying and working on the spruce beam airplane, which he kept for years at the Fallston airport," said a daughter, Johanna H. Martino of Clarksville.

Mr. Heyck, who built his first camera when he was 11, enjoyed collecting antique electronics, radio and aircraft parts.

His wife of 58 years, the former Ellise Haupt, died in 2006.

He was a longtime member of St. John's Lutheran Church, 3911 Sweet Air Road, Phoenix, where services will be held at 2 p.m. tomorrow.

Also surviving is a son, Walter S. W. Heyck of Jackson, N.J.; four other daughters, Edith G.I. Heyck of Amesbury, Mass., Heike A.M. Heyck of Phoenix, Baltimore County, Helga K. Heyck of Winthrop, Maine, and Erika C. Fisher of Cockeysville; a brother, Hartmut Heyck of Ottawa, Canada; a sister, Hannelies Heyck of Waterloo, Canada; and nine grandchildren.

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