Cabdriver shot to death in Charles Village area

CRIME WATCH

June 06, 2007|By Richard Irwin | Richard Irwin,Sun Reporter

A cabdriver was fatally shot last night as he transported a passenger in Baltimore's Charles Village after a road rage incident on a nearby street, city police said.

No arrest had been made late last night, and the nature of the argument was not known, said Agent Donny Moses, a city police spokesman.

About 9 p.m., Northern District police received a call of a shooting in the 100 block of W. 28th St. between Maryland Avenue and North Howard Street, Moses said.

"When police arrived, they found the driver of a Checker cab slumped in the driver's seat bleeding from a bullet wound to the head," Moses said.

He said the driver, whose name was not immediately released, was taken by a city Fire Department ambulance to Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he was pronounced dead at 9:30 p.m. A male passenger in the cab was not injured.

Moses said police were interviewing the cab's passenger in an effort to learn where the argument occurred and what it was about.

The police spokesman said the cab and a dark car were each traveling eastbound in the 100 block of W. 28th St. when, during an argument, a passenger or the driver of the other vehicle fired at least one shot that struck the cabdriver in the head.

The dark car sped away, and its driver tried to go north on southbound-only Maryland Avenue, then backed up and struck a car ahead of the cab before speeding away on 28th Street. The driver of the other car was not hurt.

Moses said that after the cabdriver was shot, the cab stopped or drifted backward and struck a car directly behind it. The female driver of that car was not injured.

Morris Hunt, 44, said he was in his home several doors from the shooting scene when he heard one gunshot.

"Then I heard the sound of a crash, and that was probably the cab hitting the car behind it," said Hunt, a Johns Hopkins University employee.

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