School board spot filled

May 27, 2007|By Laura McCandlish | Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter

Jeffrey L. Morse, a longtime biology and environmental science teacher at Littlestown High School in Pennsylvania, has been appointed to fill a vacancy on the Carroll County Board of Education, school officials announced Friday.

Morse, a resident of Silver Run near Union Mills, will complete the term of Thomas Hiltz, who stepped down from the board in March.

"I'm tickled to death, honored and a little overwhelmed," Morse said Friday afternoon of the appointment by Gov. Martin O'Malley.

On the board, Morse said he would work to reduce class sizes in the middle and high school grades. He said he would have to learn to organize the tremendous load of school board paperwork, which could quickly overwhelm his home near the Pennsylvania line.

Morse, 53, said he has been active with Carroll County PTAs at Charles Carroll Elementary and East Middle. His daughter, Charlotte, 14, is an eighth-grader at East Middle, where his son, Ben, 12, a sixth-grader at the Montessori School in Westminster, plans to go next year. Morse has also been involved in the Silver Run/Union Mills Lions Club and community theater in Hanover.

A native of upstate New York, Morse moved to Maryland after graduating from college in 1976 and settling in Carroll County 20 years ago.

The Carroll County school board forwarded the names of three possible candidates to O'Malley's office on May 9. The other two candidates were Virginia Harrison, a Sykesville dressmaker and chairwoman of the county's Human Relations Commission, and C. Scott Stone, a Hampstead resident who served on the school board for more than a decade, with his final term ending last year. The three finalists were chosen from among 22 candidates interviewed by the school board.

Morse expects to be sworn in at the June 13 board meeting to begin the term, which ends in December 2008.

laura.mccandlish@baltsun.com

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