UM's law school moves up in national rankings

March 31, 2007|By Gadi Dechter

The University of Maryland's law school moved up in U.S. News and World Report's latest graduate school rankings, while the Johns Hopkins University maintained leading positions in medicine, public health and biomedical engineering.

"We moved up more places in the rankings than any other top-tier law school," said Karen Rothenberg, the dean of the University of Maryland law school. "It's extraordinary."

The Baltimore-based program jumped six slots this year to 36th overall in the magazine's rankings and 15th among public institutions. It cracked the Top 50 in 2001.

But Robert Morse, U.S. News' research director, said the magnitude of Maryland's jump was "exaggerated," because eight schools tied for the 36th spot in this year's ranking, effectively eliminating all spots between 37th and 44th.

Yale, Harvard and Stanford universities took the top three law school slots this year, respectively.

Announced yesterday, the lists also reflect the Baltimore area's strength in health-related disciplines.

Johns Hopkins maintained its second-place ranking among medical research schools, behind Harvard. In research specialties, Hopkins was ranked first in internal medicine, pediatrics and geriatrics.

Hopkins' Bloomberg School of Public Health received the highest ranking, as did its engineering school's biomedical division -- though the overall engineering ranking sank from 21st to 26th. The University of Maryland's law school also won a second-place ranking in the health care law specialty.

In the business category, the University of Maryland, College Park's graduate programs ranked 25th overall in the country, a jump of 13 spots over last year. The top three business schools retained their respective slots: Harvard, Stanford and the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School.

Among graduate education programs, College Park was ranked 21st overall, with a top spot in the educational counseling specialty.

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.