The Week That Was

March 25, 2007

Arrests afflict job hunters

More than 21,000 people were arrested in Maryland last year and released without charges, most of them in Baltimore. After they were freed, though, the records of their arrests lived on. But momentum in the General Assembly is building behind a bill to automatically wipe out those arrest records.

Taser use is scrutinized

The death of a mentally ill Baltimore County man as police attempted to subdue him with a Taser has revived a debate about the safety of the high-voltage stun guns and whether police might be too quick to use them.

Bethesda move may be at risk

Plans to expand the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, part of a military realignment plan expected to bring thousands of jobs to Maryland, might be in jeopardy because of the dispute over Walter Reed Army Medical Center, according to members of the state's congressional delegation.

Tapes of Bromwell made public

Former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. boasted to an FBI informant, who was posing as a financier, of wielding political power to influence some of Maryland's most prominent institutions to benefit himself and friends, according to recordings made public last week.

Mayor offers city spending plan

Mayor Sheila Dixon's proposed 2008 fiscal year budget would collect about $1.3 billion in taxes, including property tax, local income tax and recordation fees -- about 6.6 percent higher than the current fiscal year.

O'Malley signs new ground rent ban

Gov. Martin O'Malley signed into law Thursday a ban on new ground rents in Maryland, while the General Assembly worked to pass a package of bills that would phase out existing ground rents and ensure that the system could no longer be used to seize houses from their owners.

Fish hatcheries fight disease

State officials have begun an aggressive program of trying to contain a disease found in trout at three hatcheries in Garrett County -- caused by a deadly parasite that deforms fishes' spines and has them swimming in circles, known as "whirling disease."

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