Roger Cedeno

Q&A //

March 17, 2007|By Roch Kubatko

After taking a year off from professional baseball, outfielder Roger Cedeno signed a minor league contract with the Orioles on Dec. 6. Cedeno hasn't played in the big leagues since the St. Louis Cardinals released him June 24, 2005. He broke into the majors with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1995. Cedeno has donated money to aid flood and mudslide victims in his native Venezuela, and to families of 9/11 victims.

Why didn't you play last season? -- I just wanted to take some time off and see the game from a different side, and spend some time with my family, my kids. And that was pretty much it.

Did it seem like everyone was rooting for Boston in the 2004 World Series besides St. Louis fans? -- Yeah, probably. But it's understandable. They had The Curse and they won, but St. Louis won last year. But it definitely felt that way to us.

What's been your most painful injury? -- When I got hurt in 2000. I got five fractures in my right hand. That's the hardest one. I was sliding, trying to get a stolen base, and I hit the bag and hurt my hand. That's definitely the one. I was out for six weeks. That's the longest time I've been out with an injury.

What's a relaxing night for you? -- Being with my two daughters. They're 7 and 3. No matter how hard the day is, when you come home and spend time with them, that takes everything out of your mind. That makes your brain relax. They help you out, your family. That's the most important thing, spending time with them.

What compels you to donate so much time and money to charities? -- We do that every year because I feel like God has been too good to me. That really makes me feel good. I grew up very poor. I know how hard it is to go through the hard situations. My mother raised six kids by herself. She was alone. I had a lot of tough times growing up. So I know what it's like when people are struggling. That really pushes me. I've got to do this every year. As long as I'm making money, I'm going to do something. It makes me feel real good.

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