Sports Digest

SPORTS DIGEST

March 13, 2007

Horse racing

Real Quiet remains at New Bolton

Real Quiet, the 1998 Kentucky Derby winner whom syndicate manager Mike Jester expected to be released from the New Bolton Center perhaps as early as last week, remains under care at the facility in Kennett Square, Pa. "Real Quiet was admitted because he was sore in his hind end," Dr. Dean Richardardson said last night. " ... We discovered that he had relatively difficult to diagnose infections in both hind feet. They are responding well to treatment." Real Quiet, who also won the Preakness, is 12 and resides at Pin Oak Lane Farm in New Freedom, Pa.

Sandra McKee

Iditarod

Mackey takes lead in race's final leg

Lance Mackey's team surged ahead in the final leg of the 1,100-mile Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Mackey, 36, is trying to become the first to win the Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race and the Iditarod in the same year.

Golf

Francella wins LPGA playoff

Meaghan Francella made a 4-foot birdie putt and beat Annika Sorenstam on the fourth hole of a playoff to win the rain-delayed MasterCard Classic in Huixquilucan, Mexico, for her first victory on the LPGA Tour. Francella, the 2003 Atlantic Coast Conference champion who earned her tour card last year with a fifth-place finish on the Futures Tour money list, made the winning 4-foot putt after Sorenstam missed a 7-foot birdie try. Francella, making only her sixth start on the tour, began the day with a one-stroke lead. Francella, who last month missed the cut at the SBS Open, closed with a final-round, 3-under 69 for an 11-under 205.

Obituary -- Bud Allin, a Vietnam War veteran who won five times on the PGA Tour and found his greatest joy as a golf instructor, has died. He was 62. He died of cancer Saturday in Hemet, Calif., the PGA Tour said. He had said this year he had cancer in five parts of his body. Allin played college golf at BYU but left school early to enlist in the Army. He did two tours in Vietnam and earned two Purple Hearts, according to Golfweek magazine.

Doping

Spanish judge drops cycling probe

The investigation that shook cycling ended without indictments when the judge said he could not charge anyone because Spain's new doping law was not in place when the case broke last May. The ruling by Antonio Serrano was dated March 8. The International Cycling Union and the Spanish cycling federation also must decide whether to discipline dozens of riders implicated in the case known as Operation Puerto.

Olympics

Swim champion De Bruijn retires

Four-time Olympic swimming champion Inge de Bruijn retired, having not competed in any major events since the 2004 Athens Games. The Dutch swimmer, 33, completed her career with eight Olympic medals and five world championships. She earned three golds at the 2000 Sydney Games (50-meter freestyle, 100 free, 100 butterfly) and a silver in the 400 free relay.

Et cetera

N. Colorado punter pleads not guilty

A former Northern Colorado backup punter accused of stabbing the starter pleaded not guilty to charges of attempted murder and assault. Mitch Cozad is accused of leaving a 3- to 5-inch deep gash in Rafael Mendoza's kicking leg during a Sept. 11 ambush. Police have said they believe Cozad stabbed Mendoza in an attempt to get the starting job.

Women's soccer -- Ally Wambach scored two goals and Carli Lloyd got her fourth of the tournament, leading the United States over Sweden, 3-2, in Vila Real de Santo Antonio, Portugal, for a place in the Algarve Cup final. In other news, the United States will play China and Brazil in warm-up matches before heading to the Women's World Cup. The Americans will play China on June 16 and Brazil seven days later at East Rutherford, N.J., the U.S. Soccer Federation said.

Cycling -- French sprinter Jean-Patrick Nazon won the first stage of the Paris-Nice race in France, and David Millar retained the overall lead. Nazon covered the 115 miles in 4 hours, 29 minutes, 39 seconds.

From staff and wire reports

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