Arugula rules as ingredient in dressing

DINNER TONIGHT

February 21, 2007|By Renee Enna | Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune

Those bags of prepacked greens aren't just for salads. Some lend themselves to form the base of nutritious and delicious dressings for salads and sandwiches.

Here, we're combining baby arugula and using its peppery flavor with the oniony tang of chives and orange juice. The beauty of these bold ingredients is that you can substitute low-fat mayonnaise for the full-fat variety and not miss a beat of flavor.

Because we squeezed a fresh navel orange to supply our juice quotient, we decided to use the rest of the fruit as a garnish. Potato salad makes a creamy counterpoint. Orange sherbet topped with fresh blueberries brings a sunny sweetness.

Renee Enna writes for the Chicago Tribune, which provided the recipe analysis. Arugula-Chive Salmon Wraps

Serves 4 -- Total time: 26 minutes

2 fillets salmon

2 teaspoons olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

freshly ground pepper

2 cups baby arugula (divided use)

1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise

2 tablespoons each: chopped chives, orange juice

12 cherry or grape tomatoes, halved

4 whole-wheat tortillas

Heat broiler. Brush salmon with oil; season with salt and pepper to taste. Broil, skin-side down, until flaky, about 6 minutes. Set aside and keep warm.

Meanwhile, make the dressing. Combine 1 1/2 cups of the arugula, mayonnaise, chives, orange juice and pepper to taste in a food processor or blender; pulse until combined to desired texture.

Chop the salmon into bite-sized pieces. Divide dressing among tortilla wraps; distribute tomatoes and remaining arugula among wraps. Place salmon on top; roll tightly in tortillas.

Per serving: 316 calories, 13 grams fat, 2 grams saturated fat, 72 milligrams cholesterol, 25 grams carbohydrate, 29 grams protein, 663 milligrams sodium, 2 grams fiber

Menu

Arugula-Chive Salmon Wraps

Potato salad

Orange slices

Orange sherbet with blueberries

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