Film series takes note of black jazz musicians

Local Screenings

Local Screenings

February 09, 2007|By Chris Kaltenbach | Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter

Amonthly film series highlighting African-American jazz musicians and their contributions to popular culture begins Tuesday at An die Musik Live, 409 N. Charles St., with Cartoons That Sing. The night will feature animation going back to the years before World War II, and will be replete with music from Cab Calloway, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dizzy Gillespie (in 1962's Oscar-winning short, The Hole), Ella Fitzgerald, the Mills Brothers, Roberta Flack and others. Future series offerings include Baltimore Musicians in Film and Song (March 13), Film Portrait of Duke Ellington (April 17) and Laugh Track, Soundtrack, Off Track - Classic Comedy Captured on Film (May 15). Showtime is 7 p.m.; tickets are $8. Information: andiemusiklive.com or 410-385-2638.

Work in progress

Chops, a documentary-in-progress from first-time filmmaker Bruce Broder, will be previewed Tuesday at the Maryland Institute College of Art's Brown Center, 1301 Mount Royal Ave. The film follows a high school band as it progresses in a national competition put together by Wynton Marsalis and the people who run Jazz at Lincoln Center. Tuesday's screening is sponsored by the Maryland Film Festival. Broder will be on hand to present the film and answer questions afterward. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Tickets are free, but seating is limited. Information: 410-752-8083 or www.mdfilmfest.com.

Pay it forward

Filmmakers willing to share knowledge of their trade, or perhaps with a work they'd like to premiere and talk about, might want to give the Creative Alliance a try. Through Tuesday, alliance officials are accepting workshop applications; if accepted, salaries are based on a split of the registration fees. Information: Kristen Anchor at 410-276-1651 or kristen@creativealliance.org.

Gordon Parks tribute

A tribute to pioneering black director Gordon Parks concludes at the American Film Festival's Silver Theatre this weekend with Shaft, his 1971 film that was the first major studio release directed by an African-American. Richard Roundtree stars as a street-smart private eye hired by Harlem drug lord Bumpy Jonas (Moses Gunn) to find his kidnapped daughter. Isaac Hayes' instantly recognizable theme song won an Oscar in 1972, and the film became a blaxploitation classic. Showtimes at the Silver, 8633 Colesville Road in Silver Spring, are 9 p.m. today and 10:30 p.m. tomorrow. Prices and information: 301-495-6720.

chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com

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