Annapolis wins one for Brady

Annapolis 71 No. 4 Broadneck 70

Boys Basketball

January 26, 2007|By Pat O'Malley | Pat O'Malley,SUN REPORTER

It was like old times with Broadneck at Annapolis in boys basketball last night - a packed house, high spirit on both sides and a thrilling game that went down to the wire.

Only one thing was missing - Annapolis coach John Brady, who is mourning the death of his 81-year-old mother, Clara.

The Panthers (12-3) delivered for the 30-year coach by taking a 71-70 decision over the No. 4 Bruins (15-1), whose school-record winning streak ended at 15.

Despite his absence, Brady was credited with his 621st win, tying late Cardinal Gibbons coach Ray Mullis for most career victories by a Baltimore-area coach.

Broadneck's Clyde Gross, who averages 16.1 points, was held to a season-low four points and watched his layup attempt rim out at the buzzer.

Zach Gassman (13 points, 11 rebounds) had missed two free throws with 10 seconds left after Lateef Williams (20 points) had given Annapolis the lead at 71-70 with a pair from the line with 32 seconds left.

"It definitely felt like the late 1980s, early '90s," said Bruins coach Johnny Williams, who played at Broadneck back then. "It was a lot of fun. It was a great ballgame to be a part of. They did a great job getting the ball to [David] Chapman [20 points, eight rebounds] down low.

"We had the ball in the right person's hands," Williams said, referring to Gross. "He made a great attempt, and I thought it was going in."

J.J. Hicks led the Bruins, who shot 26-for-72 from the floor, with a game-high 28 points.

Brady's mother's funeral was Tuesday, and the coach was in school for a short time yesterday, according to Nick Good-Malloy, who ran the team with fellow assistant Daryl Reid last night.

"It was a great win for us," Reid said. "The team really rallied around their coach not being here. They played really hard."

pat.omalley@baltsun.com

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