Road has many curves and many speeds

WATCHDOG

January 23, 2007|By Laura Barnhardt

THE PROBLEM

Charlie Cockey reports an abrupt change in speed limits - seemingly without regard to safety - on South Rolling Road near the Interstate 195 interchange and the Southwest Park and Ride lot.

THE BACKSTORY

With its sharp curves and inclines, Rolling Road has vexed more than one traveler.

Cockey notes that says speed is restricted to 30 mph on South Rolling Road from Frederick Road past Catonsville High School. The speed limit is also 30 mph as South Rolling Road becomes Selford Road. But between those two areas - a stretch of less than a mile from Wilkens Avenue to Sulphur Spring Road - the posted speed limit jumps to 40 mph.

"All the traffic from the park and ride, the airport and 95 are filtering into Rolling Road right where there's a bump up of the speed limit," Cockey says.

Although a 10 mph change in speeds doesn't seem egregious to the Watchdog, we agree that a steady 30 mph speed limit seems most prudent for the road.

The State Highway Administration owns and sets the speed limit for the 2.7-mile stretch of South Rolling Road, also known as Route 166, which extends from Frederick Road to Interstate 95.

Studies in 2005 showed that 85 percent of drivers traveled about 37 mph on South Rolling Road near Bloomsbury Avenue, and that they drove about 44 mph closer to I-195, meaning the posted limits meet standards, said David Buck, an SHA spokesman.

WHO CAN FIX THIS

At a resident's request, any one of seven SHA district engineers can have staffers prepare a study to evaluate a speed limit, though studies aren't generally repeated in a three-year period. In the Catonsville area, the district engineer is David Malkowski, 410-321-2800.

UPDATE -- Last week, we reported misspellings in two signs. One has been fixed.

The lane called "COLDSPRING" on an overhead sign at Roland Avenue has once again correctly become two words: "COLD SPRING."

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