Cal Ripken Jr. Hall Of Fame

January 10, 2007

1982

Two dates from Ripken's rookie year defined the course of his career. On May 30, The Streak began. On July 1, he was moved from third base to shortstop. He responded by winning the American League Rookie of the Year award and helping the Orioles remain in contention for the AL East crown until the final game. His first Opening Day was memorable, with three hits, including a home run. The season included 44 consecutive errorless games at third base, his first grand slam and a five-hit game.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .264

HOME RUNS -- 28

RUNS BATTED IN -- 93 -- ROOKIE OF THE YEAR

1983

In a magical year, Ripken emerged as the first player to win the American League's Rookie of the Year and Most Valuable Player awards in consecutive seasons. He also became the first Oriole to play every inning of every game. He topped it all off by catching a line drive from Philadelphia's Garry Maddox to end the World Series and secure the only championship of his career. Ripken led major league shortstops in assists (534) and American League shortstops in total chances (831) and double plays (113).

BATTING AVERAGE -- .318

HOME RUNS -- 27

RUNS BATTED IN -- 102 -- AL MVP, ALL-STAR, SILVER SLUGGER, CO-MOST VALUABLE ORIOLE

1984

The Orioles weren't in a pennant race, but Ripken added to his growing legacy. With a new four-year contract that paid him about $4 million, Ripken again played every inning of every game, hitting for average and power. He set the American League record for assists with 583, and led the club by hitting .311 with runners in scoring position. The season marked his first start in an All-Star Game. Ripken also joined childhood idol Brooks Robinson as the only Orioles to hit for the cycle.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .304

HOME RUNS -- 27

RUNS BATTED IN -- 86 -- ALL-STAR STARTER, SILVER SLUGGER

1985

With veterans Jim Palmer, Al Bumbry and Ken Singleton gone, Ripken took on a greater load and delivered, placing first or second on the team in 12 offensive categories. His consecutive-games streak reached 603 and his consecutive-innings streak hit 5,457, but both were endangered when Ripken sprained his left ankle in a game on April 10. The Orioles played an exhibition game the next day, which Ripken spent on crutches. He remained in the lineup for the next official game.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .282

HOME RUNS -- 26

RUNS BATTED IN -- 110 -- ALL-STAR STARTER, SILVER SLUGGER

1986

After 19 consecutive winning years, the Orioles collapsed in the season's final two months and finished last in the American League East, 22 games out of first place. Ripken continued to exhibit the traits of a leader, pacing all shortstops in home runs, RBIs, runs and slugging percentage for the fourth straight season. He remained dependable in the clutch, tying for the AL lead with 15 game-winning RBIs. He became the first player other than Eddie Murray to lead the team in home runs in the 1980s.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .282

HOME RUNS -- 25

RUNS BATTED IN -- 81 -- ALL-STAR STARTER, SILVER SLUGGER

1987

Ripken had his father, Cal Sr., as manager and his brother Bill as a double-play partner, but the Orioles finished sixth in the American League East, with 95 losses. Ripken's .252 batting average was his lowest average in six full seasons. He hit .229 after May 16. He still drove in nearly 100 runs, but as his batting average fell, talk intensified of ending The Streak. But it stood at 927 consecutive games after the season. Cal Sr., in his first season as manager, halted his son's consecutive-innings streak at 8,243.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .252

HOME RUNS -- 27

RUNS BATTED IN -- 98 -- ALL-STAR STARTER

1988

Ripken's slow start mirrored that of the Orioles, who lost their first 21 games, the worst start in major league history. Through 12 games, Ripken had only two hits in 43 at-bats (.047). But he rebounded with a 29-for-55 binge to raise his average to .316 on May 8. The Orioles finished with a club-record 107 losses, but Ripken's final numbers were respectable. Despite the firing of his father as manager six games into the season, he rejected free agency, signing a three-year, $6.3 million contract extension July 27.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .264

HOME RUNS -- 23

RUNS BATTED IN -- 81 -- ALL- STAR STARTER, CO-MOST VALUABLE ORIOLE

1989

Ripken served notice early that this season would be far different from the previous year's 107-loss debacle. On Opening Day, he hit a three-run homer off ace Roger Clemens to spark a victory over Boston. The Orioles emerged as surprise contenders under manager Frank Robinson, challenging Toronto until the final weekend in an improbable worst-to-first bid. Ripken had a 47-game errorless streak and led major league shortstops in putouts, assists, total chances and double plays.

BATTING AVERAGE -- .257

HOME RUNS -- 21

RUNS BATTED IN -- 93 -- ALL-STAR STARTER, SILVER SLUGGER

1990

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