Robert Joseph Winters Sr., 84

Printing firm manager

January 02, 2007

Robert Joseph Winters Sr., a World War II veteran who worked in Baltimore's printing industry for more than 40 years, died of cancer Friday at Berlin Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. He was 84.

The longtime Perry Hall resident was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in the 1940s. After high school, Mr. Winters worked in the china department of Hutzler's department store on Howard Street.

In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served in Africa and Europe with the 47th Medical Battalion of the 1st Armored Division. He participated in the landing at Anzio in Italy. After being discharged from the Army in 1945, he went back to work for Hutzler's, this time as a floor supervisor.

He began his printing career with Lord Baltimore Press in 1948, where he started as a night plant superintendent and worked his way up to accounts executive. The company, which later became a division of International Paper Co., specialized in high-quality, multicolored packaging for such nationally known companies as Coca-Cola, McCormick & Co., and Revlon.

After the company closed its plant, Mr. Winters worked for Alford Packaging until he retired in 1991. Mr. Winters also attended night school at the University of Baltimore for three years.

He met his wife, the former Roberta Tewey, after he came back from the war. The two were married in 1947.

He lived in Perry Hall for 43 years before moving to West Fenwick, Del., in 1993.

He was an avid reader who was particularly fond of detective and law novels.

A Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 2 p.m. Friday at Our Lady of Grace Roman Catholic Church in Parkton. A military funeral will follow.

In addition to his wife, survivors include two sons, Robert Winters Jr. of Cincinnati and Richard Winters of New Freedom, Pa.; a daughter, Suzanne Goad of Sparks; and five grandchildren. Another son, David Winters, died in 1978.

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